General Education Curriculum

Solid Foundations for Your Education

Students laughing in classFocusing on the diverse areas which comprise general education, from communicating effectively and thinking critically, to making ethical decisions and solving complex problems, to valuing the humanity, diversity, and wonders of nature which make our planet a wonderful place to call home. 

Wherever you are in your personal or professional journey, the School of General Education will help you continue to expand your horizons, make new discoveries, and gain new insights in the fields of communication, culture and society (which reflect the fields of the humanities and social sciences), ethics, mathematics, and science.

Higher Education at the Highest Standards

Kaplan University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and committed to the highest standards. Our specific programs hold additional industry-relevant approvals and accreditations.



How Do I Get Started?

Kaplan University offers multiple start dates, giving you greater flexibility with your education, life, and work schedules. Certain start dates may not be available at all ground locations; speak with an advisor for additional information.

07

Dec

Online Start Date

December 07, 2016

04

Jan

Online and Campus Start Date

January 04, 2017

01

Feb

Online Start Date

February 01, 2017

01

Mar

Online and Campus Start Date

March 01, 2017

22

Mar

Online and Campus Start Date

March 22, 2017

19

Apr

Online Start Date

April 19, 2017

17

May

Online and Campus Start Date

May 17, 2017

07

Jun

Online and Campus Start Date

June 07, 2017

05

Jul

Online Start Date

July 05, 2017

02

Aug

Online and Campus Start Date

August 02, 2017

23

Aug

Online and Campus Start Date

August 23, 2017

20

Sep

Online Start Date

September 20, 2017

18

Oct

Online and Campus Start Date

October 18, 2017

08

Nov

Online and Campus Start Date

November 08, 2017

06

Dec

Online Start Date

December 06, 2017

Curriculum: General Education Courses — Undergrad

Desired Track
General Education Courses — Undergrad
  • General Education Courses — Undergrad
  • General Education Courses — Grad
  • Mathematics

    Total Mathematics Credits: 36

    Total Program Credits: 0

    • MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS Change

      Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • MM 207: STATISTICS Change

      This course serves as an introduction to collecting, organizing and summarizing, and analyzing data using statistical software. Topics include basic terminology, measurement, sampling procedures, graphical and numerical descriptions of data, basic probability, and making inferences from a sample to the population. Statistical software is required in this course and used extensively. The course focuses on “thinking with” statistics rather than “computing” statistics.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      MM 150 or higher

    • MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA Change

      This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • MM 250: DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Change

      This course is designed to provide information technology and computer science students with an overview and appreciation of mathematical concepts, highlighting applications of mathematics to information technology and computer science. Topics include set theory, logic, matrices, sequences and series, graph theory, and algorithm analysis. The student will complete assignments in each of these areas and be able to identify and apply the core concepts in each of these areas to related problems.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      MM 150 or MM 212

    • MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES Change

      In this course, the student will apply math skills and knowledge to solve financial problems and conduct statistical analyses. Through expert step-by-step guidance using sample problems and solutions related to banking, credit, basic finance, investments, and statistics, the student will also gain an understanding of financial instruments and terminology used in business. 

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      MM 150 or higher
       

    • MM 260: LINEAR ALGEBRA Change

      This course is designed to provide students with an overview and appreciation of linear algebra concepts, highlighting applications of linear algebra to real-world situations. Topics include vector operations, matrices, spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and real-world applications of linear algebra. The student will complete assignments in each of these areas and be able to identify and apply the core concepts in each of these areas to related problems.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      MM  212

    • MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Change

      This course introduces the student to basic business statistics and quantitative analysis and their application in solving business problems. Through a combination of readings, practical application exercises, discussions, and use of computer software packages, the student will be provided with the introductory knowledge and the skills needed by managers to optimize the decision-making process.

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      Students enrolled in a School of Business of Finance programs: MM 255; all other students: MM 207 or MM 255

  • Science

    Total Science Credits: 73

    Total Program Credits: 0

    • SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION Change

      This is an introductory-level course in which students investigate the fundamental concepts of nutrition: food sources, nutrient function, digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Special attention is given to learning to apply nutritional principles to food choices in a way that encourages a healthy lifestyle. Students will learn how nutritional needs change from infancy through adulthood including pregnancy and the senior stages of life.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I Change

      In this course, students are taught the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the various body systems, structures, cells, and tissues and the principles of homeostasis. Students are introduced to the organization and structure of the human body. This course includes a lab component.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II Change

      In this course, which is a continuation of SC 121: Human Anatomy and Physiology I, students are taught the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include, but are not limited to, the cardiopulmonary, immune, gastrointestinal, urinary, and reproductive systems. These systems will be covered on a cellular, tissue, organ, and system level. This course includes a lab component.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      SC 121

    • SC 156: PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY Change

      This course will allow you to examine the basic principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on the chemical processes that affect your life. You will learn how to apply a variety of chemical concepts, such as the states of matter and chemical properties and reactions, to better understand the natural and human-made world. No previous knowledge of chemistry is needed to enroll in this non-majors science course.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      MM 212 highly recommended

    • SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD Change

      This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 225: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE—ECOSYSTEMS, RESOURCES, AND CARBON FOOTPRINTS Change

      This course offers students a chance to apply basic scientific principles to an exploration of the environment and the role of humans within it. The course addresses the interrelationships between natural systems and the increasingly industrial, technological societies humans create. Students will examine a variety of ethical and cultural perspectives on nature and the environment, with an eye toward giving students the skills to think critically about global challenges such as energy, food, population, and climate change. As part of this ongoing analysis, students will examine how they might be able to apply sustainable living concepts to their personal lives and reduce their own carbon footprint.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 226: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE LAB Change

      This lab course will accompany SC 225: Environmental Science—Ecosystems, Resources, and Carbon Footprints. The lab course provides practical applications via science lab activities with interactive modules. Each unit has a discussion board and a written component; often a module has two experiments or activities. The course allows students to have first-hand experience of important scientific aspects of environmental studies including air quality, ecological concerns, waste-management issues, and energy consumption and conservation.

      Credits:

      2

      Prerequisites Required:

      Concurrent enrollment in SC 225

    • SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES Change

      In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 236: GENERAL BIOLOGY I LAB Change

      This lab course will accompany SC 235: General Biology I—Human Perspectives. The lab course approaches science practically, tying interactive experiments and observations to the knowledge associated with General Biology I—Human Perspectives. Each unit has a discussion board and a written component; often a module has two experiments or activities. Specifically, this lab course includes topics such as air quality and ecology as they impact human health, an intensive lab study of the human respiratory system, and the roles of genetics and heredity in human biology.
       

      Credits:

      2

      Prerequisites Required:

      Concurrent enrollment in SC 235

    • SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY Change

      Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their effect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE Change

      Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 328: HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY Change

      The studies include histological structures of various tissues of the body and the correlation to their functions at the tissue and organ level. The study of embryology focuses on stages of human development with an emphasis on factors influencing development including common developmental disorders.

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 330: IMMUNOLOGY Change

      This course encompasses the study of the immune system including its development and functions. Students learn about normal immune response and immunologic disorders such as hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiencies including AIDS. The applications of immunology in tumor immunology, transplantation immunology, diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of various diseases are discussed in detail.

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SC 335: BIOCHEMISTRY Change

      This course familiarizes students with proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, and their structure, chemical composition, and functions. Studies include chemical characteristics, nomenclature, kinetic control, and functions of enzymes.

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      SC 156 recommended

    • SC 435: GENETICS Change

      This course explores the molecular basis of genetics as applied to human health, including developmental genetics, immunogenetics, and cancer genetics. Using case studies, students learn the role of dominant and recessive genes in various diseases and the importance of genetic counseling. In addition, students will discuss gene-mapping methodologies and ethical issues in the context of clinical genetics.

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

  • Culture and Society

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 73

    Total Program Credits: 0

    • CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE Change

      This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

      Credits:

      3

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • CS 210: CAREER DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES Change

      This course introduces the student to the lifelong process of career planning and development. Emphasis is placed on identifying current skill sets needed in the student's chosen profession. Self-assessment activities will enable students to identify their current qualifications and set goals to fill gaps that may exist. Students will prepare a career portfolio that contains job-search documents used to research companies, apply for jobs that match their qualifications, and track their progress toward educational and career goals.

      Credits:

      2

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any College Composition I course

    • HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE Change

      In this course you will be introduced to the humanities through a survey of human social and cultural life in a global setting. By investigating the social, artistic, religious, and economic developments of countries throughout the world, you will better understand each country’s cultural identity as well as begin to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • HU 320: CULTURE—RELIGION AND IDENTITY Change

      We live in a diverse world with global economies, internationally mobile workforces, and networked conference/call centers, as well as megachurches, cathedrals, synagogues, ashrams, mosques, and temples. In order to communicate effectively with people from a variety of religious backgrounds, students must be knowledgeable about the origins and belief systems of the main contemporary religions. This course will provide a journey into the philosophical, historical, and sociological elements of religions that have both influenced and have been influenced by cultures. Through historical accounts, stories, virtual field trips, and philosophical readings, students will discover the values and meaning that religions provide to individual people, and thus the common threads that should allow effective communication. 

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH Change

      This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 144: SOCIOLOGY Change

      An understanding of the dynamics of human societies and group behavior is useful for any work environment or professional career. This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of the discipline of sociology. Students will explore society and social life through the study of language, culture, race and ethnicity, gender, inequality, education, deviance, and sociological theory and methods. Students are also encouraged, through course assignments and discussions, to examine the influences of society on their personal lives.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM Change

      This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 216: COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Change

      This course allows students to use their career skills and interests to become more engaged in the community. The course explores service and community engagement based on sociological theory. Analysis of topics includes volunteerism, philanthropy, grantsmanship, NGOs and service organizations, as well as faith-based organizations. The course includes opportunities to participate in direct service learning with the purpose of supporting students’ community and service interests. 

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SS 230: MAKING HISTORY—THE FOUNDING FATHERS Change

      Americans use the term “Founding Fathers” all the time: not only are the Founders a popular subject in history, but they are also cited in modern political debates—almost as if they were still living authorities on contemporary issues. Students will explore the culture of early America, the context that molded the Founders ideologies, and the issues that were central to their time. This course aims to unlock the mystery of the Founding Fathers and to provide students with an accurate, thorough assessment of their historical significance and enduring legacy.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Change

      The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 260: GENDER AND SOCIETY Change

      This interdisciplinary course explores the importance of gender in human social interactions in a modern society. You will learn about how gender as a concept is shaped by history, culture, and globalization. The roles of men and women and the perceptions of self are examined through male-female expectations and social behaviors. This course is essential for understanding the impact and importance of gender in personal lives, social groups, and modern work environments.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SS 270: SOCIAL PROBLEMS Change

      This course explores the problems that transcend individual solutions, such as inequality, poverty, racial and gender discrimination, and environmental pollution, and how social problems affect us in our homes, in our communities, and in the workforce. Analysis of topics includes local, national, and global perspectives.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 295: WORLD CONFLICT Change

      This course examines world conflict using the anthropological perspective. The course readings introduce the culturally based sources of conflict, explore the relationship between technology and weaponry, and consider how peace is a strategy to prevent war. Course assignments provide opportunities to observe, analyze, and propose solutions for conflict in the real world.
       

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • SS 360: AMERICAN WOMEN Change

      This course examines how gender shapes the experience of women in their social, political, and professional roles. The exploration includes the impact of class, religion, race, and ethnicity on gender roles and expectations for women from 1848 through the present day. Additionally, students will explore the cultural influence of women throughout American history including contributions of women to philosophy, literature, and art. Throughout the course, students will investigate themes of continuity and change in the lives of American women.

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • SS 368: SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH AND DYING Change

      This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the cultural dimensions of death and dying. This topic affects each of us because of our own mortality and our relationships with others who die, whether close to us or complete strangers. The primary goals of the course are to help students deepen their understanding of the cultural dimensions of death and dying and to enable them to become a more effective provider of support. 

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

  • Ethics

    Total Ethics Credits: 21

    Total Program Credits: 0

    • HU 200: ARTS AND HUMANITIES—MODERN CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS Change

      As a human, you have the unique ability to appreciate beauty. This course will help you to discover human potential as expressed through the arts and humanities. In this course, you will evaluate the impact of creative expression on cultures by studying examples from the humanities disciplines. You will investigate how creative expressions broaden perspective. As an arts and humanities student, you will analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply this new found insight to your career goals, community, and daily experience.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • HU 245: ETHICS Change

      In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • HU 345: CRITICAL THINKING Change

      This course helps students apply tools of informal logic and critical thinking to practical situations they encounter in everyday life. Students will learn how to use methods of critical thinking to evaluate arguments, claims, and strategies for constructing sound arguments. They will also learn how to identify and respond to faulty or manipulative reasoning in their own thinking and arguments, and in the thinking and arguments of others. In addition, students will assess the reasoning found in mass media (such as websites, advertisements, and newspapers). Finally, students will apply the concepts
      they study to real-world issues of personal and professional significance. 

      Credits:

      6

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

    • HU 280: BIOETHICS Change

      In this course, students develop and apply sound ethical reasoning and judgment to important issues in health care. Topics studied include access to health care, medical privacy, end-of-life care, genetic screening, and emerging genetic technologies. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytic methods. 

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

  • Communication

    Total Communication Credits: 17

    Total Program Credits: 0

    • CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I Change

      Building on your existing writing strengths will help develop a foundation for a successful education and career. You will learn strategies to express yourself with confidence and communicate your ideas effectively in personal, academic, and professional situations.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II Change

      This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      None

    • CM 241: FOUNDATIONS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION Change

      This course will examine fundamental components of technical communication, which include analyzing audience, defining objectives, designing documents, testing usability, and editing content. Students will use digital media tools to create a formal technical document tailored to meet the needs of an identified audience.

      Credits:

      2

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course
       

    • CM 250: FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAMMAR AND EDITING Change

      Writing well is an important communication skill for technical writers and those in other professional writing careers. This course addresses grammar basics, punctuation, sentence structure, style, and editing. Students will practice editing their own writing at different stages, correcting and refining their writing skills.

      Credits:

      5

      Prerequisites Required:

      Any college composition course

Can I Afford This?

Kaplan University is committed to helping you find more ways to save on college tuition. Our Tuition Cap, scholarships, grant, military reductions, and transfer and experiential learning credits are some of the ways we can help lower the cost of your tuition and help you graduate sooner.

Ways to Save

Here are some of the ways we can help lower the cost of your tuition and help you graduate sooner.

Helpful Information

Whether you are on your way up the corporate ladder or just getting started, our degree programs and certificates could help you prepare to take your career to a higher level.

View Brochures

Request More Information

To receive the Kaplan University Program Guide, including areas of study and associated career paths, please complete this information form.