• CPS - Tolerance 150

    International Day for Tolerance, November 16, 2012

    In a world that continues to become more connected and where geographic barriers are being erased with the Internet, the importance of tolerance is an important issue. To generate public awareness and emphasize the dangers of intolerance and to promote tolerance and education, the International Day for Tolerance is observed on November 16.

    Our world is filled with diverse religions, beliefs, cultures, languages, ethnicities, and ways of being. It’s important that governments, schools, communities, families, and workplaces understand the concept of tolerance. Tolerance is not looking the other way or being indifferent to others, it is about recognizing, respecting, valuing, and understanding differences.

    The International Day for Tolerance aims to promote tolerance with education that should focus on countering “influences that lead to fear and exclusion of others, and should help young people develop capacities for independent judgement, critical thinking and ethical reasoning.”

    This annual observance was first declared by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1995. Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser, President of the 66th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, invites the United Nations Member States to promote “the universal human rights and fundamental freedoms of their peoples by supporting activities that build tolerance, including those directed towards educational establishments and the wider public.”

    Countries are encouraged to motivate their citizens by educating everyone at all levels about what tolerance is and about the dangers of intolerance—a necessity to move towards a peaceful future and one of understanding and respect for others and the world.

    View the below videos to learn more about tolerance and the dangers of intolerance. You can also visit the United Nations website at www.un.org/en/events/toleranceday to learn more about International Tolerance Day.

    “Teaching Tolerance” CBS Evening News story on the public school system of Modesto, California, which requires high school students to take a religion class. The goal of this course is to educate others about different religions and, as the reporter mentions, “to create one community where everyone is accepted.”

    “Stigma Stops with You” A video made by youth fellow of MyMediaLife, a program of Connected Health Solutions that aims to raise social awareness on how stigmas can start at home. 

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