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  • GEM_s

    GEM Courses are Taking Flight at Kaplan University

    The General Education Mobile (GEM) program was designed to help U.S. Air Force members fulfill their general education requirements in a mobile, nontraditional classroom format. Completing the GEM program is a key step toward earning your associate's degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

  • Please note—if you would like to enroll in the GEM program at Kaplan University, you must first speak to an Admissions Advisor at 877.757.8188. You will then complete the application on the AI Portal.

    The General Education Mobile (GEM) program was designed to help US Air Force members fulfill their general education requirements in a mobile, nontraditional classroom format. Completing the GEM program is a key step toward earning your associate's degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

    GEM can be completed with 5 online courses at Kaplan University. If you already have some college experience, the number of courses required may be reduced. 

    • Each course corresponds to a general education area requirement for a degree.
    • GEM courses are taught 100 percent online.
    • Each term lasts 10 weeks.
    • You may take more than 1 course per term and complete the GEM in less than 7 months.

    Why is GEM so important?

    General education courses are the foundation of your college studies. These courses prepare you for the degree- specific and higher-level courses you will need to earn your degree. The GEM program allows you to build that foundation, even if you can't attend classes in a traditional school setting.

    After completing GEM, you can focus on earning credits within your specific discipline through additional college courses, training you have taken with CLEP and DANTES exams, and credits earned through your military work.

    When enrolling in a course, please be sure to complete your tuition assistance form within the GEM search plan.

    Other Courses to Support your CCAF Associate's Degree

    We offer additional courses beyond the GEM program which may help you complete other elements of your CCAF associate degree. Please check with your Air Force CCAF representative to determine if you need any of the courses offered. You can view the Non-GEM courses offered in the curriculum table below. 

  • Curriculum: GEM Courses

    Communications Courses

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Building on your existing writing strengths will help develop a foundation for a successful education and career. You will learn strategies to express yourself with confidence and communicate your ideas effectively in personal, academic, and professional situations.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Communications Courses Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 214: PUBLIC SPEAKING FOR THE PROFESSIONAL (5 Credits)

    This course provides students with practical advice and essential skills for public speaking in a variety of professional settings. Students will learn how to create presentations that are organized, well researched and persuasive. In addition to learning how to be effective oral communicators, students will explore how to address diverse audiences and analyze the impact of their communication in terms of persuasiveness, ethical considerations, and intended purpose. They will create and deliver presentations on diverse topics to an array of audiences and critique examples from professional speeches to understand what constitutes effective speaking.

    Prerequisites Required: Any College Composition I course

    Total Communications Courses Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II (5 Credits)

    This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Communications Courses Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Mathematics Courses

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Mathematics Courses Credits: 10
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Mathematics Courses Credits: 10
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Humanities Courses

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Humanities Courses Credits: 10
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Humanities Courses Credits: 10
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Social Science Courses

    SS 144: SOCIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    An understanding of the dynamics of human societies and group behavior is useful for any work environment or professional career. This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of the discipline of sociology. Students will explore society and social life through the study of language, culture, race and ethnicity, gender, inequality, education, deviance, and sociological theory and methods. Students are also encouraged, through course assignments and discussions, to examine the influences of society on their personal lives.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 230: MAKING HISTORY—THE FOUNDING FATHERS (5 Credits)

    Americans use the term “Founding Fathers” all the time: not only are the Founders a popular subject in history, but they are also cited in modern political debates—almost as if they were still living authorities on contemporary issues. Students will explore the culture of early America, the context that molded the Founders ideologies, and the issues that were central to their time. This course aims to unlock the mystery of the Founding Fathers and to provide students with an accurate, thorough assessment of their historical significance and enduring legacy.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 232 : DECODING THE VISUAL WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is a comprehensive examination of visual images that have had a profound impact upon human society. In examining such images, this course explores the way that photographs, logos, symbols, paintings, sculpture, film, and other visual media influence personal and cultural identity, shape knowledge, and transmit notions of beauty. Within this study, we will cover topics of politics, gender, athletics, marketing, war, and several other key areas.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 270: SOCIAL PROBLEMS (5 Credits)

    This course explores the problems that transcend individual solutions, such as inequality, poverty, racial and gender discrimination, and environmental pollution, and how social problems affect us in our homes, in our communities, and in the workforce. Analysis of topics includes local, national, and global perspectives.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Business Courses

    BU 204: MACROECONOMICS (5 Credits)

    Macroeconomics involves the theory, principles, and practices of economics that affect the national economy as a whole. Topics covered in this course include national income determination, economic growth, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, unemployment, inflation, the Federal Reserve system, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

    Prerequisites Required:

    BU 224

    Total Business Courses Credits: 26
    Total Program Credits: 0

    BU 224: MICROECONOMICS (5 Credits)

    As an introduction to economic principles that influence decisions of individual consumers and business managers, students will examine how the law of supply and demand is reflected in pricing and quantity decisions in a variety of market situations, how a firm's cost structure affects such decisions, and how an individual's concept of cost versus benefit enters into the decision process, as well as the role of governmental influence in attempts to modify market outcomes.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Business Courses Credits: 26
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MT 140: INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course provides an introductory overview of management theory, management functions, organizational structure, daily management responsibilities, ethics, and current management tools and resources. Theoretical concepts will be illustrated with practical application to real-world management problems and scenarios. Implications for managing change within the context of a global economy and other dynamic environmental forces are also examined.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Business Courses Credits: 26
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MT 203: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will examine the processes involved in human resources from a managerial perspective. Students will examine the functions of human resource management, including job analysis, staffing, performance appraisal, training and development, compensation, labor relations, and legal requirements.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Business Courses Credits: 26
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MT 302: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (6 Credits)

    This course explores human behavior in organizations. You will examine individual behavior, attitudes, personality, values, perception, and emotions and how these affect organization outcomes. The course also examines the theories, concepts, and application of motivation as well as the importance of stress management, professional ethics, and organizational culture. You will gain an understanding and appreciation for communication processes, channels, and styles. You will also gain a set of organizational design tools.

    Prerequisites Required: MT 140

    Total Business Courses Credits: 26
    Total Program Credits: 0

    General Education Courses

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Building on your existing writing strengths will help develop a foundation for a successful education and career. You will learn strategies to express yourself with confidence and communicate your ideas effectively in personal, academic, and professional situations.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II (5 Credits)

    This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 207: STATISTICS (5 Credits)

    This course serves as an introduction to collecting, organizing and summarizing, and analyzing data using statistical software. Topics include basic terminology, measurement, sampling procedures, graphical and numerical descriptions of data, basic probability, and making inferences from a sample to the population. Statistical software is provided in the course and extensive use of that software is required. The course focuses on “thinking with” statistics rather than “computing” statistics. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 150 or higher

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 225: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE—ECOSYSTEMS, RESOURCES, AND CARBON FOOTPRINTS (5 Credits)

    This course offers students a chance to apply basic scientific principles to an exploration of the environment and the role of humans within it. The course addresses the interrelationships between natural systems and the increasingly industrial, technological societies humans create. Students will examine a variety of ethical and cultural perspectives on nature and the environment, with an eye toward giving students the skills to think critically about global challenges such as energy, food, population, and climate change. As part of this ongoing analysis, students will examine how they might be able to apply sustainable living concepts to their personal lives and reduce their own carbon footprint.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 144: SOCIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    An understanding of the dynamics of human societies and group behavior is useful for any work environment or professional career. This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of the discipline of sociology. Students will explore society and social life through the study of language, culture, race and ethnicity, gender, inequality, education, deviance, and sociological theory and methods. Students are also encouraged, through course assignments and discussions, to examine the influences of society on their personal lives.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 230: MAKING HISTORY—THE FOUNDING FATHERS (5 Credits)

    Americans use the term “Founding Fathers” all the time: not only are the Founders a popular subject in history, but they are also cited in modern political debates—almost as if they were still living authorities on contemporary issues. Students will explore the culture of early America, the context that molded the Founders ideologies, and the issues that were central to their time. This course aims to unlock the mystery of the Founding Fathers and to provide students with an accurate, thorough assessment of their historical significance and enduring legacy.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 232 : DECODING THE VISUAL WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is a comprehensive examination of visual images that have had a profound impact upon human society. In examining such images, this course explores the way that photographs, logos, symbols, paintings, sculpture, film, and other visual media influence personal and cultural identity, shape knowledge, and transmit notions of beauty. Within this study, we will cover topics of politics, gender, athletics, marketing, war, and several other key areas.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 260: GENDER AND SOCIETY (5 Credits)

    This interdisciplinary course explores the importance of gender in human social interactions in a modern society. You will learn about how gender as a concept is shaped by history, culture, and globalization. The roles of men and women and the perceptions of self are examined through male-female expectations and social behaviors. This course is essential for understanding the impact and importance of gender in personal lives, social groups, and modern work environments.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 270: SOCIAL PROBLEMS (5 Credits)

    This course explores the problems that transcend individual solutions, such as inequality, poverty, racial and gender discrimination, and environmental pollution, and how social problems affect us in our homes, in our communities, and in the workforce. Analysis of topics includes local, national, and global perspectives.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total General Education Courses Credits: 80
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Information Technology Courses

    IT 163: DATABASE CONCEPTS USING MICROSOFT ACCESS (5 Credits)

    This course is an introduction to relational database management systems. Students will use a relational database management system to create and maintain a database. Students will create filters, sorts, queries, forms, and reports. Emphasis will be placed on the skills needed to meet user requirements.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Information Technology Courses Credits: 20
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IT 133: MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATIONS ON DEMAND (5 Credits)

    This course teaches students to use the Microsoft Office suite of applications. Topics include an introduction to Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and cloud-based file management systems. Students will also learn how to analyze appropriate software applications to address solutions within a profession.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Dynamic Description:

    Throughout your educational and professional career, you may often need to use such applications as Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. IT 133: Software Applications, will provide you with those desired skills and the ability to meet the demands of future classes and requirements in today's workplace. You will acquire some powerful take away skills in this class that can be used to further enhance your Microsoft Office application skills.

    Sample Projects:    www.screencast.com/t/H6Ha18Ml

    What's Next?

    After successfully completing IT 133, you may want to learn more about Excel. If that is the case then consider taking IT 153: Spreadsheet Applications. This course will help you to gain a deeper understanding of the power of Excel. The skills you will acquire in IT 133 are relevant to what businesses are currently looking for in perspective employees and could help prepare you for your upcoming job searches.

    Total Information Technology Courses Credits: 20
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IT 190: FOUNDATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Students will explore the basic concepts of information technology including hardware, software, and networks. The student will gain a practical understanding of how computer hardware and operating systems work. Topics include personal computer configuration and maintenance, along with the fundamentals of system software installation and administration.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Dynamic Description:

    Having a foundational understanding of computers and computer concepts is imperative to today's information technology (IT) professional. Whether you have chosen to pursue a career in programming, health informatics, web design, networking, etc., understanding how a computer works both inside and out will prepare you for a successful career in IT.

    In this course, you will learn some of the fundamentals of computers. Possible topics include:

    •  How society is affected and changed by computers
    •  How a computer operates; binary code, operating systems, different applications
    •  Hardware that makes up a computer and how the different computer specifications may affect your choices
    •  How computers communicate and the hardware and software required to network computers together
    • Different types of networks and how to protect those networks from both physical and logical failure
    • Ethical issues that affect computer users every day

    Sample Project:

    animoto.com/play/nBlu2EHXbZml043c17xy9A

    What's Next?

    Computer literacy is a required skill for competing in today's work force. It provides a foundation for any computer related career from accounting to networking. Having the fundamental skills required to use computers is just the first step in developing a successful future.

    Total Information Technology Courses Credits: 20
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IT 273: NETWORKING CONCEPTS (5 Credits)

    This course introduces the concepts behind today’s networks. It outlines current network design, explaining the OSI Model and the methods of carrying data over wired and wireless media. Other topics include fundamental network design components, such as topologies and access methods, basic administration of network operating systems, and troubleshooting methods for data transmission and recovery.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    In this program you will learn the principles and terminology of network administration as you prepare for a career in a variety of entry-level positions in network technology and administration.* You will be provided with the skill sets needed to analyze, design, and evaluate network hardware and software solutions.

    * Kaplan University cannot guarantee employment or career advancement. 

    Sample Project:

    A key part of the course assignment is your ability to use a drawing tool called Microsoft Visio. Throughout the course, you will be tasked with developing Microsoft Visio diagrams of computer networks. A quick way to pick up how to use this tool is to watch the following 10 minute YouTube video.

    How to Use Microsoft Visio: A Basic Overview (10 minutes)

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmDjmm0btO8

     

    What's Next?

    The skills from this course will help you determine what area of computer networking you may be interested in seeking certifications in addition to your degree. While a degree opens up many doors, employers also look at certifications in addition to your degree.

      Although certain programs at Kaplan University are designed to prepare students to take various certification or licensing exams, the University cannot guarantee the student will be eligible to sit for or pass those exams. In some cases, field experience, additional coursework, and/or background checks may be necessary to be eligible to take or to successfully pass the exams.

    Total Information Technology Courses Credits: 20
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Social Science Courses

    PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology, one of the social sciences. Students will be introduced to a range of topics that offer insight into human thought and actions including what motivates us to study human behavior, ethical decisions, problem solving, and theories on memory, learning, intelligence, and personality. This course will highlight the use of critical thinking and the application of the concepts. In addition, it will draw on practical psychological concepts related to students’ personal and professional relationships. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 10
    Total Program Credits: 0

    PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course explores the historical origins of psychological study and the influences that have shaped contemporary views of the field. Students will learn about the origins of the study of the mind, the social and cultural factors that shaped the scientific approach to psychology, and modern-day applications of psychology. Students will also be introduced to the major theories and theorists in this discipline.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Social Science Courses Credits: 10
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Tuition & Fees: GEM Courses

    GEM Courses Online &
    Learning Center
    Campus
    Cost Per Credit
    Number of Credits / Terms  
    Total Tuition Cost

    Tuition and Fees

    Some programs have additional associated fees that are not included in the price of tuition. Click here or check with an Admissions Advisor for more information.

    Learn More about Kaplan University Tuition and Fees 

    Notice to Learning Center Students

    Kaplan University Learning Center students will only complete a portion of their program on site. You will need to complete at least 50% of the program requirements online, or through transfer credit awarded via prior learning assessment. If you have any questions about these requirements, please speak with an admissions advisor. Not all programs are available for enrollment at Kaplan University Learning Centers.

    Scholarships and Grants

    Learn more about grants and Kaplan University Scholarships and that may help reduce the cost of your education.

    Kaplan University tuition reductions (including active-duty, spouse, and veterans military tuition rates; scholarships; grants; vouchers; and alumni and alliance reductions) cannot be combined. 

    Tuition Rates for Military Students and Spouses

    Kaplan University has significantly reduced many of our tuition rates and fees for active-duty servicemembers, their spouses, and veterans. Click here for more information.

  • Other Courses to Support Your CCAF Associate's Degree
    Non-GEM Course List

    Course Code

     Course

    School

    BU204

    Macroeconomics

    Business

    BU224

    Microeconomics

    Business

    MI140

    Introduction to Management

    Business

    MI203

    Human Resource Management

    Business

    MI302

    Organizational Behavior

    Business

    CM107

    College Composition I

    General Education

    CM220

    College Composition II

    General Education

    HU245

    Ethics

    General Education

    HU250

    Humanities and Culture

    General Education

    MM150

    Survey of Mathematics

    General Education

    MM207

    Statistics

    General Education

    MM212

    College Algebra

    General Education

    SC225

    Environmental Science

    General Education

    SC235

    General Biology I Human Perspectives

    General Education

    SS144

    Sociology

    General Education

    SS230

    Making History–the Founding Fathers

    General Education

    SS232

    Decoding the Visual Word

    General Education

    SS236

    People, Power, and Politics–an Introduction to American Government

    General Education

    SS250

    The Technological Revolution–a Social Scientific Approach

    General Education

    SS260

    Gender and Society

    General Education

    SS270

    Social Problems

    General Education

    IT163

    Database Management

    Information Technology

    IT133

    Software Applications

    Information Technology

    IT190

    Foundations in Information Technology

    Information Technology

    IT273

    Networking Concepts

    Information Technology

    PS124

    Introduction to Psychology

    Social and Behavioral
    Sciences

    PS210

    History of Psychology

    Social and Behavioral
    Sciences

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