K
  • Note: For certain locations, program enrollment is onsite with online instruction.

  • This program is offered online.
  • Kaplan University offers multiple start dates, giving you greater flexibility with your education, life, and work schedules.

    Jul 30

    Online Start Date
    Jul 30, 2014

    May 14

    Online Start Date
    May 14, 2014

    Jun 11

    Online and Campus Start Date
    Jun 11, 2014

    View the Academic Calendar
  • Curriculum: Standard Track

    Core

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Students will learn how to communicate effectively in their professional field using various writing styles. Students will also identify and further develop their own writing process. Grammar and mechanics will be reviewed, helping students focus on the areas that will improve their writing.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II (5 Credits)

    This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM (5 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students
    a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their affect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE (5 Credits)

    Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

     

     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Major

    HS 100: INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SCIENCE (5 Credits)

    In this required introductory course, students will identify current issues in health science and how they relate to chosen health science professions. Educational and credentialing requirements will be defined for health science occupations. Students will create a personal education plan, choosing appropriate electives and identifying specific career options based on personal goals and research of the profession. Professional traits and skills for success in the field will be explored as well as discussion of roles and responsibilities of selected health professionals. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    HS 120: ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (5 Credits)

    This course is an integrated study of the human body. The focus is on understanding the interrelated nature of the systems of the body. This includes the concept of homeostasis as well as the relationship between structure and function. This course encompasses the anatomy of selected systems as well as the physiology and terminology as applied to the body. The course presents the chemical basis of life and provides a basic understanding of cells, cellular metabolism, and tissue composition and functions. The course also includes the study of the structures and functions of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, and senses. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    HS 130: ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (5 Credits)

    This course is the continuation of integrated study of the human body. This course encompasses the anatomy of selected systems as well as the physiology and terminology as applied to the body. The course also includes the study of the structures and functions of the following systems: circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive.

    Prerequisites Required:

    HS 120

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 205: FOOD SAFETY AND MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course covers the major issues in food safety and food microbiology. It includes the basic principles of food safety and sanitation, various microorganisms that cause foodborne illnesses, the flow of food through the food service establishment, and management’s role in training the food handler. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 210: NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT (5 Credits)

    This course includes the study of methods and equipment used for nutritional analysis in health, obesity, and malnutrition. Students learn how to utilize the software based on manual data-gathering systems to assess nutritional status.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 220: NUTRITION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course addresses nutritional planning for the maintenance of health and wellness. The studies include identification, assessment, and management of nutritional deficiencies occurring due to food choices and pharmacotherapy.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SC 156: PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY (5 Credits)

    This course is an overview of the fundamental theories of chemistry and provides a foundation for students pursuing future studies or careers in science-related fields. Topics will introduce students to aspects of general, organic, and biochemistry. Students will learn the basic concepts in chemistry needed to be successful in their field, such as scientific inquiry, naming organic compounds, and the names and structures of amino acids.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 212 highly recommended

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    100/200-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVE (5 Credits)

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 315: NUTRITIONAL BIOCHEMISTRY (6 Credits)

    The course examines the physiochemical aspects of energy metabolism and macro- and micronutrients. Mechanisms underlying the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, and special nutrients are discussed. The biochemical basis of various nutritional disorders, including metabolic and genetic disorders, is studied.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 156 and NS 220 or NS 270

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 325: NUTRITION ACROSS THE HUMAN LIFE CYCLE (6 Credits)

    Studies in this course encompass the nutritional issue across the life cycle, including pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation. The course considers nutritional aspects related to neonates, infants, and children. The special needs of adolescents and disorders affecting this age group are discussed. The coursework will also include a discussion of nutritional demands and food choices in the geriatric population.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 115, NS 220, or NS 270

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 335: NUTRITION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS (6 Credits)

    Studies in this course emphasize the nutrition and dietetic considerations for healthy individuals with special needs, such as geriatric and gender-specific needs. The coursework includes analyzing nutritional and dietetic needs, and designing appropriate protocols for clients with chronic, progressive, or degenerative diseases and metabolic disorders, as well as for special needs children and infants. The course addresses the underlying principles of total parenteral nutrition and nasogastric tube feeding.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 156, NS 220, or NS 270

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    300/400-LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES (24 Credits)

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    NS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN NUTRITION SCIENCE (6 Credits)

    This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science. This course builds on the concepts of all the courses students have taken within the program of study. The capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their coursework in an original comprehensive project, and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program in nutrition science.

    Prerequisites Required: Last term

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Open Elective

    OPEN ELECTIVES* (59 Credits)

    Total Open Elective Credits: 59
    Total Program Credits: 180

    *Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Master of Health Care Administration or Master of Public Health option will take up to five graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

    Prior Degree

    Comparable Associate’s or Bachelor’s Degree (90 Credits)

    Total Prior Degree Credits: 90
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Comparability is determined by a course-by-course examination of the prior associate's or bachelor's degree against the core requirements of a Kaplan University associate’s degree.

    Prerequisites

    HS 260: ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY, AND CHEMISTRY (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce the student to essential concepts in anatomy, physiology, and chemistry. This knowledge is necessary to successfully matriculate to upper-level courses in the School of Health Sciences. The focus is on understanding the interrelated nature of the systems of the body. This includes the concept of homeostasis as well as the relationship between structure and function. This course encompasses the anatomy of selected systems as well as the physiology and terminology as applied to the body. The course presents the chemical basis of life and provides a basic understanding of cells, cellular metabolism, and tissue composition and functions. Students are taught how to apply new knowledge about a variety of topics: the states of matter, the periodic chart, chemical properties and reactions, bonding and kinetics, and solutions, including acids, bases, and buffers, to better understand the natural and human-made world.

    Prerequisites Required: Enrollment in an advanced start degree option

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    NS 270: NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce the student to essential concepts in nutrition that are necessary to successfully matriculate to upper-level courses in the School of Health Sciences. This course includes study of methods and equipment used for nutritional analysis in health, obesity, and malnutrition and also addresses nutritional planning for maintenance of health and wellness. Also included are the identification, assessment, and management of nutritional deficiencies that occur due to food choices and pharmacotherapy.

    Prerequisites Required: Enrollment in an advanced start degree option

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SC 156: PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY (5 Credits)

    This course is an overview of the fundamental theories of chemistry and provides a foundation for students pursuing future studies or careers in science-related fields. Topics will introduce students to aspects of general, organic, and biochemistry. Students will learn the basic concepts in chemistry needed to be successful in their field, such as scientific inquiry, naming organic compounds, and the names and structures of amino acids.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 212 highly recommended

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Bachelor's Core

    CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM (5 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students
    a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their affect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE (5 Credits)

    Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

     

     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Major

    NS 315: NUTRITIONAL BIOCHEMISTRY (6 Credits)

    The course examines the physiochemical aspects of energy metabolism and macro- and micronutrients. Mechanisms underlying the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, and special nutrients are discussed. The biochemical basis of various nutritional disorders, including metabolic and genetic disorders, is studied.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 156 and NS 220 or NS 270

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    NS 325: NUTRITION ACROSS THE HUMAN LIFE CYCLE (6 Credits)

    Studies in this course encompass the nutritional issue across the life cycle, including pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation. The course considers nutritional aspects related to neonates, infants, and children. The special needs of adolescents and disorders affecting this age group are discussed. The coursework will also include a discussion of nutritional demands and food choices in the geriatric population.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 115, NS 220, or NS 270

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    NS 335: NUTRITION FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS (6 Credits)

    Studies in this course emphasize the nutrition and dietetic considerations for healthy individuals with special needs, such as geriatric and gender-specific needs. The coursework includes analyzing nutritional and dietetic needs, and designing appropriate protocols for clients with chronic, progressive, or degenerative diseases and metabolic disorders, as well as for special needs children and infants. The course addresses the underlying principles of total parenteral nutrition and nasogastric tube feeding.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 156, NS 220, or NS 270

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    300/400 LEVEL: MAJOR ELECTIVES (24 Credits)

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    NS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN NUTRITION SCIENCE (6 Credits)

    This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science. This course builds on the concepts of all the courses students have taken within the program of study. The capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their coursework in an original comprehensive project, and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program in nutrition science.

    Prerequisites Required: Last term

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Electives

    OPEN ELECTIVES (24 Credits)

    Total Electives Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Tuition & Fees: Standard Track

    The 25% tuition reduction applies only to international students living outside of the United States. This discount does not apply to military students. Please check with your advisor to see if you are eligible. 

    The 25% tuition reduction applies only to international students living outside of the United States. This discount does not apply to military students. Please check with your advisor to see if you are eligible. 

    Standard Track Online &
    Learning Center
    Campus
    Cost Per Credit
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    Tuition and Fees

    Some programs have additional associated fees that are not included in the price of tuition. Click here or check with an Admissions Advisor for more information. 

    Learn More about Kaplan University Tuition and Fees  

    Notice to Learning Center Students

    Kaplan University Learning Center students will only complete a portion of this program on site. You will need to complete at least 50% of the program requirements online, or through transfer credit awarded via prior learning assessment. If you have any questions about these requirements, please speak with an admissions advisor.

    Scholarships and Grants

    Learn more about grants and Kaplan University Scholarships and that may help reduce the cost of your education.

    Kaplan University tuition reductions (including active-duty, spouse, and veterans military tuition rates; scholarships; grants; vouchers; and alumni and alliance reductions) cannot be combined. 

    Tuition Rates for Military Students and Spouses

    Kaplan University has significantly reduced many of our tuition rates and fees for active-duty servicemembers, their spouses, and veterans. Click here for more information.
     

  • Some states have additional curricular requirements. Check the University Catalog or speak with an Admissions Advisor.

  • * Kaplan University’s Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science program is not accredited by the The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). While the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science program is designed to academically prepare students to pursue a variety of nutrition-oriented careers and advanced education, the program does not lead directly to certification as a registered dietitian.

    Kaplan University cannot guarantee employment or career advancement.

    Associate’s and bachelor’s degrees and credits considered to be remedial, occupational, or specialized may not be accepted for transfer. Average completion time based on a full-time schedule. Programs will take longer for part-time students to complete. Refer to the University Catalog for our Transfer of Credit policy.

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