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  • Gen Ed - Communication

    Solid Foundations for Your Education

    Focusing on the diverse areas which comprise general education, from communicating effectively and thinking critically, to making ethical decisions and solving complex problems, to valuing the humanity, diversity, and wonders of nature which make our planet a wonderful place to call home. 

    Wherever you are in your personal or professional journey, the School of General Education will help you continue to expand your horizons, make new discoveries, and gain new insights in the fields of communication, culture and society (which reflect the fields of the humanities and social sciences), ethics, mathematics, and science.

  • Kaplan University offers multiple start dates, giving you greater flexibility with your education, life, and work schedules.

    May 14

    Online Start Date
    May 14, 2014

    Jun 11

    Online Start Date
    Jun 11, 2014

    Jul 02

    Online Start Date
    Jul 02, 2014

    View the Academic Calendar
  • Curriculum: General Education Courses

    Mathematics

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 207: STATISTICS (5 Credits)

    This course serves as an introduction to collecting, organizing and summarizing, and analyzing data using statistical software. Topics include basic terminology, measurement, sampling procedures, graphical and numerical descriptions of data, basic probability, and making inferences from a sample to the population. Statistical software is provided in the course and extensive use of that software is required. The course focuses on “thinking with” statistics rather than “computing” statistics. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 150 or higher

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 250: INTRODUCTORY DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to provide information technology and computer science students with an overview and appreciation of mathematical concepts, highlighting applications of mathematics to information technology and computer science. Topics include set theory, logic, matrices, sequences and series, graph theory, and algorithm analysis. The student will complete assignments in each of these areas and be able to identify and apply the core concepts in each of these areas to related problems.

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 150

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 255: BUSINESS MATH AND STATISTICAL MEASURES (5 Credits)

    In this course, the student will apply math skills and knowledge to solve financial problems and conduct statistical analyses. Through expert step-by-step guidance using sample problems and solutions related to banking, credit, basic finance, investments, and statistics, the student will also gain an understanding of financial instruments and terminology used in business. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 150 or higher
     

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 260: LINEAR ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to provide students with an overview and appreciation of linear algebra concepts, highlighting applications of linear algebra to real-world situations. Topics include vector operations, matrices, spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and real-world applications of linear algebra. The student will complete assignments in each of these areas and be able to identify and apply the core concepts in each of these areas to related problems.

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM  212

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 305: BUSINESS STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (6 Credits)

    This course introduces the student to basic business statistics and quantitative analysis and their application in solving business problems. Through a combination of readings, practical application exercises, discussions, and use of computer software packages, the student will be provided with the introductory knowledge and the skills needed by managers to optimize the decision-making process.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    Students enrolled in a School of Business program: MM 255; all other students: MM 150
     

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 320: MATH HISTORY (6 Credits)

    Students will develop both analytic and communication skills as they explore various topics in the history of mathematics. Topics covered will include explorations in Egyptian, Greek, Chinese, Islamic, and European contributions. There will be a quantitative component as students look at various historical practices while applying them to present-day mathematical problems. There will be a writing and research component as students prepare and complete a research paper as a final project.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 520 : GRADUATE MATH HISTORY (4 Credits)

    Students will develop both analytic and communication skills at the graduate level as they explore various topics in the history of mathematics. Topics covered will include explorations in Egyptian, Greek, Chinese, Islamic, and European contributions. There will be a quantitative component as students look at various historical practices while applying them to present day mathematical problems. There will be a writing and research component as the students prepare and complete a research paper as a final project. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 540 : ADVANCED GRADUATE GEOMETRY (5 Credits)

    Students will study the logical and historical foundations of Euclidean geometry and will explore how geometry is used in real-world situations. Essential definitions, proofs, and common construction techniques will be covered. Students will study area and volume relationships, the Pythagorean Theorem, and prove properties of polygons. Non-Euclidean geometry will be introduced and explored. The material will be taken to a higher level by an examination of geometry’s place in the contemporary world. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 570: APPLIED STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course provides students the foundation for understanding and performing statistical analyses of data with applications to psychological research. Topics include distributions, descriptive statistics, correlation, regression, tests of hypotheses, and analysis of variance techniques. Students will perform statistical tests using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and interpret those results. SPSS is required for this course.

    Prerequisites Required:

     None  

     

    Total Mathematics Credits: 56
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Science

    SC 115: PRINCIPLES OF NUTRITION (5 Credits)

    This is an introductory-level course in which students investigate the fundamental concepts of nutrition: food sources, nutrient function, digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Special attention is given to learning to apply nutritional principles to food choices in a way that encourages a healthy lifestyle. Students will learn how nutritional needs change from infancy through adulthood including pregnancy and the senior stages of life.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 156: PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY (5 Credits)

    This course is an overview of the fundamental theories of chemistry and provides a foundation for students pursuing future studies or careers in science-related fields. Topics will introduce students to aspects of general, organic, and biochemistry. Students will learn the basic concepts in chemistry needed to be successful in their field, such as scientific inquiry, naming organic compounds, and the names and structures of amino acids.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 212 highly recommended

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 121: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (5 Credits)

    In this course, students are taught the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the various body systems, structures, cells, and tissues and the principles of homeostasis. Students are introduced to the organization and structure of the human body. This course includes a lab component.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 131: HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (5 Credits)

    In this course, which is a continuation of SC 121: Human Anatomy and Physiology I, students are taught the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the various body systems, structures, cells, and tissues and the principles of homeostasis. Students focus on the organization and structure of the human body. Th is course includes a lab component.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 121

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 225: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE—ECOSYSTEMS, RESOURCES, AND CARBON FOOTPRINTS (5 Credits)

    This course offers students a chance to apply basic scientific principles to an exploration of the environment and the role of humans within it. The course addresses the interrelationships between natural systems and the increasingly industrial, technological societies humans create. Students will examine a variety of ethical and cultural perspectives on nature and the environment, with an eye toward giving students the skills to think critically about global challenges such as energy, food, population, and climate change. As part of this ongoing analysis, students will examine how they might be able to apply sustainable living concepts to their personal lives and reduce their own carbon footprint.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 226: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE LAB (2 Credits)

    This lab course will accompany SC 225: Environmental Science—Ecosystems, Resources, and Carbon Footprints. The lab course provides practical applications via science lab activities with interactive modules. Each unit has a discussion board and a written component; often a module has two experiments or activities. The course allows students to have first-hand experience of important scientific aspects of environmental studies including air quality, ecological concerns, waste-management issues, and energy consumption and conservation.

    Prerequisites Required: Concurrent enrollment in SC 225

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 236: GENERAL BIOLOGY I LAB (2 Credits)

    This lab course will accompany SC 235: General Biology I—Human Perspectives. The lab course approaches science practically, tying interactive experiments and observations to the knowledge associated with General Biology I—Human Perspectives. Each unit has a discussion board and a written component; often a module has two experiments or activities. Specifically, this lab course includes topics such as air quality and ecology as they impact human health, an intensive lab study of the human respiratory system, and the roles of genetics and heredity in human biology.
     

    Prerequisites Required: Concurrent enrollment in SC 235

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their affect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 300: BIG IDEAS IN SCIENCE—FROM METHODS TO MUTATION (6 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 325 : ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT (6 Credits)

    This course introduces the basic concepts of environmental risk assessment, assesses various potential environmental risks, and examines how science, government, business, and industry measure and prepare for environmental risks. By the end of this course, students will be able to understand the concept of risk, the ingredients of the risk assessment process, identification of risk management options, and the political factors that can influence their selection. 

    Prerequisites Required: SC 225

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 328: HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY (6 Credits)

    The studies include histological structures of various tissues of the body and the correlation to their functions at the tissue and organ level. The study of embryology focuses on stages of human development with an emphasis on factors influencing development including common developmental disorders.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 330: IMMUNOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This course encompasses the study of the immune system including its development and functions. Students learn about normal immune response and immunologic disorders such as hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiencies including AIDS. The applications of immunology in tumor immunology, transplantation immunology, diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of various diseases are discussed in detail.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 335: BIOCHEMISTRY (6 Credits)

    This course familiarizes students with proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, and their structure, chemical composition, and functions. Studies include chemical characteristics, nomenclature, kinetic control, and functions of enzymes.

    Prerequisites Required:

    SC 156

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 340: THE BIOLOGY OF POLLUTION (6 Credits)

     Biology of Pollution will review some of the major environmental pollutants found in our environment today. This course will investigate the different forms and pathways pollutants can take, and how those pollutants affect various biota such as plants, birds, and mammals. Population, community, and ecosystem effects will also be investigated in both aquatic and terrestrial systems.

    Prerequisites Required: SC 225

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 350: CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES (6 Credits)

    This course introduces students to a variety of environmental issues, all of which are associated with the use and abuse of natural resources including soil, water, fuel, living organisms, and entire ecosystems. Students will learn about the origins and nature of our environmental crisis, along with present efforts to approach sustainability in resource use. The course also explores fundamental principles of economics, ecology, and environmental ethics, and how they  each contribute both to the causes of environmental problems and to the development and implementation of  possible solutions to those problems. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 360: ENERGY AND OUR GLOBAL CLIMATE (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the close relationship between energy use and climate change. Currently, nonrenewable, carbon-based fuels supply most of the world’s energy—the same fuels that are thought to play a major role in our variable and uncertain climate. This course will review existing energy sources and examine the feasibility of more alternative sustainable sources. We will discuss ways in which energy is “delivered” including energy efficiency, renewables, and conservation. Environmental impacts for each source are examined including options that could be pursued to mitigate those impacts. Finally, this course will examine the ongoing debate surrounding global warming, the global effects of climate change, and the choices that need to be made for a more sustainable future.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 370: ECOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS (6 Credits)

    This course provides students with an overview of ecology by focusing on the dynamics of ecological interactions. Concepts will begin with the idea of an organism’s environmental space and branch out to the fundamentals of mutualism, commensalism, competition, and predation. Examples from nature will illustrate these concepts, and scientific literature will supplement readings.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 430: MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY (6 Credits)

    Studies of eukaryotic cell structure and function introduce students to the exciting and rapidly expanding world of molecular and cell biology. Coursework includes regulation of the cell cycle, genomics, proteomics, and bioenergetics. The application of principles of molecular and cell biology to cell signaling, cell death, cell renewal, cancer, and stem cell research are discussed.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 435: GENETICS (6 Credits)

    This course explores the molecular basis of genetics as applied to human health, including developmental genetics, immunogenetics, and cancer genetics. Using case studies, students learn the role of dominant and recessive genes in various diseases and the importance of genetic counseling. In addition, students will discuss gene-mapping methodologies and ethical issues in the context of clinical genetics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 525 : ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT I (5 Credits)

    This course is technically oriented to examine the components of human health and ecological risk assessments. Students learn how to complete each step including risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication through the analysis of case studies. Students will also gain knowledge of relating risk assessment methodologies, procedures, and results to environmental policies. By the end of this course students will be able to complete a risk assessment, recognize risk management options, and identify political factors that can influence their selection. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 526 : ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE LAB (5 Credits)

    This graduate-level lab provides practical applications via science lab activities with interactive modules. Each unit has both a discussion board and written component following a module detailing an experiment or other activity. The course provides students with hands-on experience with important scientific aspects of environmental studies including air quality, ecological concerns, waste-management issues, and energy consumption and conservation.

    Prerequisites Required:

     None  

     

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 540: BIOLOGY OF POLLUTION (5 Credits)

    Biology of Pollution will assess the interactions between environmental pollutants and the biotic systems they affect. Specific situations where pollutants have affected various biota, such as plants, birds, and mammals, will be analyzed and strategies will be formulated on how to approach these situations. The effects of pollution on both aquatic and terrestrial populations, communities, and ecosystems will be assessed.  

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 550 : CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES (5 Credits)

    This course will examine concepts of natural resources and conservation, and explore how economics, ethics, and ecology can be applied to natural resource management, both in the United States and globally. Students are challenged to apply concepts learned to address the managing of natural resources in a number of regional and global contexts. Management issues relating to freshwater, agriculture, energy, wildlife, ecosystems, and ocean resources will be examined. Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on developing viable solutions to our current natural resource challenges.  

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 560 : ENERGY AND OUR GLOBAL CLIMATE (5 Credits)

    Energy and Our Global Climate will provide students with a working knowledge of existing carbon-based energy sources and more sustainable alternative energies. The intimate relationship between energy use and climate change will be examined in depth. Environmental impacts will be discussed and options to mitigate said impacts will be developed. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SC 570 : ECOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS (5 Credits)

    This course will provide students with an overview of ecology and a focus on the dynamics of ecological interactions. Concepts will begin with the idea of an ecological niche and branch out to the fundamentals of mutualism, commensalism, competition, and predation. Emphasis will be placed on concept application through the incorporation of scientific literature. As students become familiar with the literature, they will learn to evaluate assigned readings for validity in the scientific forum and synthesize class concepts. Learning to evaluate and critique current literature is essential for graduate students in all fields. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Science Credits: 135
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Culture and Society

    CS 210: CAREER DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES (2 Credits)

    This course introduces the student to the lifelong process of career planning and development. Emphasis is placed on identifying current skill sets needed in the student's chosen profession. Self-assessment activities will enable students to identify their current qualifications and set goals to fill gaps that may exist. Students will prepare a career portfolio that contains job-search documents used to research companies, apply for jobs that match their qualifications, and track their progress toward educational and career goals.

    Prerequisites Required: Any College Composition I course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    EL 203: PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT (5 Credits)

    Students will develop a portfolio that describes and organizes the learning they have acquired on the job, through volunteer work, travel, etc. Students will also examine what they already know, what they have college credit for, what their future goals are, and how all of these pieces fit together. Faculty will guide students through the process and provide feedback and assistance on each component of the portfolio. Students will collect all of their previously credited learning (college transcripts, standardized exams, pre-evaluated learning, etc.) and will articulate and organize learning not already credited. This course will be graded pass/fail. 

    Prerequisites Required: Previous success in one or more college course(s)

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 261: GLOBAL CIVILIZATION (5 Credits)

    Using cultural metaphor (e.g., the Japanese garden or French wine) as a tool, this course will define the central cultural characteristics of several regions—so-called “super-powers” and marginalized areas—to reveal the perceived internal and external identity of each culture or set of cultures. The course also will reveal how cultural identity has helped shape the power structure of the contemporary world. In the process, students will learn about political, economic, social, religious, and scientific factors that inform culture. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 300: ART AND HUMANITIES—TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND (6 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 310: CULTURE, SOCIETY, AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY (6 Credits)

    How will technological innovation continue to transform culture, professional life, health, business, and education? Can technology spin out-of-control? Will developments such as artificial intelligence, bioengineering, nanotechnology, the knowledge economy, and online education lead to new cultural and social forms? In this course, students will explore some of the possibilities and perils of advanced technology. The course will draw lessons from a wide range of scholarly and fictional responses to the questions of culture, society, and advanced technology, and students will work to craft creative responses and informed, critical questions of their own.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 320: CULTURE—RELIGION AND IDENTITY (6 Credits)

    We live in a diverse world with global economies, internationally mobile workforces, and networked conference/call centers, as well as megachurches, cathedrals, synagogues, ashrams, mosques, and temples. In order to communicate effectively with people from a variety of religious backgrounds, students must be knowledgeable about the origins and belief systems of the main contemporary religions. This course will provide a journey into the philosophical, historical, and sociological elements of religions that have both influenced and have been influenced by cultures. Through historical accounts, stories, virtual field trips, and philosophical readings, students will discover the values and meaning that religions provide to individual people, and thus the common threads that should allow effective communication. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 232 : DECODING THE VISUAL WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is a comprehensive examination of visual images that have had a profound impact upon human society. In examining such images, this course explores the way that photographs, logos, symbols, paintings, sculpture, film, and other visual media influence personal and cultural identity, shape knowledge, and transmit notions of beauty. Within this study, we will cover topics of politics, gender, athletics, marketing, war, and several other key areas.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 335 : MEDICINE, HEALTH, AND SOCIETY (6 Credits)

    This course provides a social examination of the institution of medicine. As medicine has become one of the most influential institutions in modern society, it is crucial to understand its impact upon health care decisions, quality of life, and personal identity. To this end, this course will examine the influence that medicine has upon conceptions of self, understandings of life-changing illnesses, decisions about childbirth, and finally, the extent to which everyday troubles have increasingly become understood as medical problems. With special attention to this latter point, we will focus upon the concept of “medicalization,” which describes how aspects of everyday life increasingly fall within the province of medicine.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 144: SOCIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    An understanding of the dynamics of human societies and group behavior is useful for any work environment or professional career. This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of the discipline of sociology. Students will explore society and social life through the study of language, culture, race and ethnicity, gender, inequality, education, deviance, and sociological theory and methods. Students are also encouraged, through course assignments and discussions, to examine the influences of society on their personal lives.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 230: MAKING HISTORY—THE FOUNDING FATHERS (5 Credits)

    Americans use the term “Founding Fathers” all the time: not only are the Founders a popular subject in history, but they are also cited in modern political debates—almost as if they were still living authorities on contemporary issues. Students will explore the culture of early America, the context that molded the Founders ideologies, and the issues that were central to their time. This course aims to unlock the mystery of the Founding Fathers and to provide students with an accurate, thorough assessment of their historical significance and enduring legacy.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 235: TWENTIETH CENTURY AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADERSHIP (5 Credits)

    This course is an introduction to African American leadership in the twentieth century United States. Students will learn about the key men and women who helped shape the modern African American community. Through readings, web research, discussion, and writing, students will critically analyze African American leadership, the struggles African Americans faced in the twentieth century, and the qualities leaders in that community embodied to enact change. Understanding the role that history, diversity, and leadership play in our world helps prepare students to lead the way to harmonious and productive interracial relations in their own communities, work places, and society.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 260: GENDER AND SOCIETY (5 Credits)

    This interdisciplinary course explores the importance of gender in human social interactions in a modern society. You will learn about how gender as a concept is shaped by history, culture, and globalization. The roles of men and women and the perceptions of self are examined through male-female expectations and social behaviors. This course is essential for understanding the impact and importance of gender in personal lives, social groups, and modern work environments.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 270: SOCIAL PROBLEMS (5 Credits)

    This course explores the problems that transcend individual solutions, such as inequality, poverty, racial and gender discrimination, and environmental pollution, and how social problems affect us in our homes, in our communities, and in the workforce. Analysis of topics includes local, national, and global perspectives.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 310: EXPLORING THE 1960S—AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (6 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 335 : MEDICINE, HEALTH, AND SOCIETY (6 Credits)

    This course provides a social examination of the institution of medicine. As medicine has become one of the most influential institutions in modern society, it is crucial to understand its impact upon health care decisions, quality of life, and personal identity. To this end, this course will examine the influence that medicine has upon conceptions of self, understandings of life-changing illnesses, decisions about childbirth, and finally, the extent to which everyday troubles have increasingly become understood as medical problems. With special attention to this latter point, we will focus upon the concept of “medicalization,” which describes how aspects of everyday life increasingly fall within the province of medicine.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 368: SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH AND DYING (6 Credits)

    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the cultural dimensions of death and dying. This topic affects each of us because of our own mortality and our relationships with others who die, whether close to us or complete strangers. The primary goals of the course are to help students deepen their understanding of the cultural dimensions of death and dying and to enable them to become a more effective provider of support. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 375 : DAYS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD (6 Credits)

    This course examines how seemingly unimportant events can have a significant global impact on world history. The exploration includes the impact of science and technology, as well as economics and politics, on specific world events from ancient history to present. In addition, students will examine cultural and social trends throughout world history, including contributions to philosophy, literature, and art through events such as the Renaissance or the evolution of the Internet. Throughout this course, students will study examples of how one event has the potential to act as a catalyst for change throughout the world.  

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 380 : HISTORY OF MEDICINE (6 Credits)

    Why do you go to the doctor’s office when you are sick? Why do women have babies in hospitals? Why do doctors have to go to school for so long? The History of Medicine explores these questions and more. This course examines the historical role of medicine in the Western world. This examination includes the impact of race, class, and gender on access to health care and on perceptions of health and sickness. The role of major philosophical developments and their relationship to changing conceptions of medicine and public health are central to this course as well. Throughout the course, students will investigate themes of continuity and change in medical practice and in cultural perceptions of wellness, disease, and healing. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 430: MAKING A LIVING IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY—THE SOCIOLOGY OF WORK (6 Credits)

    How will the rapidly changing, global workforce affect my life and career choices? This course addresses contemporary concerns like these and helps students gain a deeper understanding of the phenomenon called work by introducing sociological theories and concepts, and discussing information that will enable learners to make sense of a seemingly unpredictable workforce environment. Past, present, and future work issues and trends will be discussed in order to place work in a relevant context. Topics include: the shift from industrial to postindustrial economies, telecommuting, outsourcing and de-skilling, joblessness, worker alienation, and the interplay between work and family.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Culture and Society Credits: 117
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Ethics

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Ethics Credits: 22
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 345: CRITICAL THINKING (6 Credits)

    This course helps students apply tools of informal logic and critical thinking to practical situations they encounter in everyday life. Students will learn how to use methods of critical thinking to evaluate arguments, claims, and strategies for constructing sound arguments. They will also learn how to identify and respond to faulty or manipulative reasoning in their own thinking and arguments, and in the thinking and arguments of others. In addition, students will assess the reasoning found in mass media (such as websites, advertisements, and newspapers). Finally, students will apply the concepts
    they study to real-world issues of personal and professional significance. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    Any college composition course

    Total Ethics Credits: 22
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HU 280: BIOETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop and apply sound ethical reasoning and judgment to important issues in health care. Topics studied include access to health care, medical privacy, end-of-life care, genetic screening, and emerging genetic technologies. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytic methods. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Ethics Credits: 22
    Total Program Credits: 0

    SS 365: APPLIED ETHICAL LEADERSHIP STRATEGIES (6 Credits)

    This course focuses on identifying, developing, and applying leadership strategies by connecting theory and practice. Students learn early theories of leadership as a foundation for understanding contemporary leadership as related to cultural diversity and inclusivity. The course explores the values, ethics, and behaviors associated with effective leaders and the rising impact of technology. The course puts theory into practice as students complete service-leaning projects in their own communities. 

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Ethics Credits: 22
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Communication

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Students will learn how to communicate effectively in their professional field using various writing styles. Students will also identify and further develop their own writing process. Grammar and mechanics will be reviewed, helping students focus on the areas that will improve their writing.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II (5 Credits)

    This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 230: CREATIVE WRITING—FICTION AND NONFICTION NARRATIVE (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop ideas and work habits as creative writers and storytellers. Knowing how to tell a successful story is both personally and professionally rewarding; fiction, biography, journalism, film, television, gaming, multimedia, blogging, and many business proposals rely on narrative content. Students will learn to identify the building blocks of a good narrative and create their own dynamic fiction or nonfiction narratives.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 240: TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (5 Credits)

    This course is an introduction to various writing formats and styles designed specifically to facilitate workplace communication. Students will study and practice audience analysis, and evaluate the components of successful business correspondence, technical reports, instructions, proposals, and presentations. Students create a portfolio of technical documents written for professional audiences, and demonstrate proficiency in technology and research, document design, and organization and writing style consistent with business and technical communication.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course | Corequisite: CM 220
     

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 250: FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAMMAR AND EDITING (5 Credits)

    Writing well is an important communication skill for technical writers and those in other professional writing careers. This course addresses grammar basics, punctuation, sentence structure, style, and editing. Students will practice editing their own writing at different stages, correcting and refining their writing skills.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 320: INTERVIEWING SKILLS FOR THE TECHNICAL WRITER (6 Credits)

    Successful technical writers know how to write well and how to identify and write for specific audiences. Technical writers may spend a large portion of their time gathering information and interviewing prior to and on completion of a project. Good interviewing and listening skills are the basis for gathering and analyzing technical information. This course will provide students with a foundation for the interviewing skills that are necessary to technical writers in today's workplace. Students will learn how to set up, prepare for, conduct, analyze, and write up interviews and information obtained through interviews.

    Prerequisites Required: CM 240

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 340: ADVANCED TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (6 Credits)

    This course builds on the skills and knowledge learned in CM 240: Technical Communication. In this course, students go beyond the introductory level of understanding what technical communication is and learn how that translates into what can be expected from a technical communicator in the workplace. This entails practicing more advanced writing styles, creating and designing professional technical documents, and learning advanced methods for gathering information and revision. Students will expand on their peer review skills by providing group members with thorough feedback that is grounded in technical communication theory and common practices. The final project is designed to help students achieve advanced skills in project development, professional writing and design, and research. Students will learn how to address ethical issues through technical communication.

    Prerequisites Required: CM 240

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 345: PROPOSAL AND GRANT WRITING (6 Credits)

    The course provides an overview of the process of writing grant proposals to request funding from for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Students will learn how to identify funding needs, search for funding opportunities, read and use RFPs, and develop a real grant proposal.

    Prerequisites Required: CM 240

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 415: EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION IN THE WORKPLACE (6 Credits)

    Effective and Appropriate Communication in the Workplace is an advanced writing course that teaches effective analysis and writing strategies for careers in communications. The goal of this course is to teach the components of professional writing so that students will be proficient communicators in their career fields. Students study the characteristics of professional writing; develop strategies for addressing internal, external, and global audiences; and practice writing professional business letters, memos, emails, and other communication relevant to their careers.

    Prerequisites Required: CM 240 and CM 250

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 445: TECHNICAL WRITING FOR THE PROFESSIONS (6 Credits)

    This course reviews the conventions and genres associated with five professions most in need of technical writers. Students will learn about opportunities and expectations for technical writers within these five professional fields (business, science, medical, information technology, and legal). Within each field, students will explore commercial, trade, and scholarly writing, and how to use stylistic and visual devices to make technical information accessible to general audiences, as well as write with precision and expertise to specialized audiences. This is a course that transitions students from college-level writing to the real world of professional communication.

    Prerequisites Required: CM 340

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

    CM 450: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN TECHNICAL WRITING (6 Credits)

    The goal of this course is to acquaint students with professional development, what it means, how to participate in professional venues associated with their career field, and how to become a lifelong learner. Students will learn how to prepare for professional opportunities in technical writing that reach beyond their occupations. This type of involvement creates active professionals that have increased promotion potential and employment prospects.

    Prerequisites Required: CM 340

    Total Communication Credits: 61
    Total Program Credits: 0

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