K
  • Note: For certain locations, program enrollment is onsite with online instruction.

  • Kaplan University offers multiple start dates, giving you greater flexibility with your education, life, and work schedules.

    Nov 12

    Online Start Date
    Nov 12, 2014

    Feb 04

    Online Start Date
    Feb 04, 2015

    Apr 22

    Online Start Date
    Apr 22, 2015

    View the Academic Calendar
  • Curriculum: Standard Track

    Core

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Building on your existing writing strengths will help develop a foundation for a successful education and career. You will learn strategies to express yourself with confidence and communicate your ideas effectively in personal, academic, and professional situations.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II (5 Credits)

    This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM (5 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students
    a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their effect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE (5 Credits)

    Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

     

     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Major

    FS 100: INTRODUCTION TO FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES (5 Credits)

    This course introduces students to careers in fire and emergency services and the Kaplan University fire and emergency management programs. The field of study, skill sets, and professionalism will be discussed. Students will learn about the historical background of the modern fire service while learning research skills for the future. This course is designed to acclimate the fire science and emergency management student to Kaplan University while providing a solid foundation for success in the fire and emergency services profession.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 105: FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES (5 Credits)

    This course examines fire avoidance measures, including fire prevention education, fire safety inspection, fire code enforcement, and fire investigation. Students will gain an overview of the procedures and principles of inspections commonly conducted for control of structures, occupancy, or combined purposes.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 120: INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course covers the four phases of emergency management: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Topics include organizing for emergency management, coordinating for community resources, and the roles of government agencies at all levels. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of comprehensive and integrated emergency management.

    Prerequisites Required:

    CM 107

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 202: PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY SERVICES (5 Credits)

    This course provides students with an overview of fire protection as well as the philosophy and history of fire protection. Students will gain an understanding of career opportunities in fire protection and related fields, fire loss analysis, and the organization and function of public and private fire protection services. This course discusses the role of fire departments as part of local governments, as well as fire service laws, regulations, and terminology. Students will also be introduced to multiagency planning and operations as related to multialarm incidents, target hazards, and major disasters. 

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 205: ETHICS FOR THE FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES (5 Credits)

    This course provides an understanding of the types of ethical issues that can arise in the fire and emergency services. Students will examine philosophical concepts as they relate to modern ethics. The course will also provide an overview of various approaches to the ethical situations faced by fire and emergency service organizations. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 208: LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMERGENCY SERVICES (5 Credits)

    This course explores the legal issues that relate to emergency services, such as arson law and legal responsibilities of emergency services officers, as well as criminal and civil law. Students will gain an understanding of laws that impact emergency services management at both the state and local levels. The course also examines recent case law and legal decisions that impact emergency services agencies.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 220: PREPAREDNESS AND PLANNING FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course analyzes the rationale for and methods related to all-hazards emergency preparedness and planning. Topics include preparedness strategies, planning concepts and processes, public awareness programs, and training and exercise programs.

    Prerequisites Required:

    FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 225: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESPONSE (5 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the response phase of emergency management including government policies related to disaster response. The content will include the purpose of the National Response Plan. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CJ 307: CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN TERRORIST ATTACKS AND DISASTERS (6 Credits)

    This course will cover the methodology and rationale behind the unified response to a terrorist, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), or disaster incident within the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS). Students will explore the management and incident command response to terrorist, WMD, or disaster events, including elements of logistics, budgeting, prioritization, staffing, and support. Students will examine these methodologies from the perspective of crisis management and consequence management.

    Prerequisites Required: CJ 101

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 304: COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION FOR FIRE AND EMS (6 Credits)

    This course analyzes theories for understanding ethical, social, organizational, political, and legal aspects of community risk reduction for fire and EMS agencies. Students will learn to utilize common methods for developing effective and comprehensive community risk-reduction plans.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 320: RECOVERY PRACTICES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course describes how people, groups, organizations, communities, and governments manage disasters in the immediate aftermath and recover from their effects, including social, physical, business, and infrastructure problems as well as intra- and interorganizational planning. 

    Prerequisites Required: FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 401: FIRE PREVENTION ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course explores the modern management and planning techniques that are utilized to organize a fire department. Students will examine fire department organization and management through community risk reduction, codes and standards, inspections, plan review, incident investigation, fire prevention research, and the relationship of master planning to fire prevention.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 402: POLITICAL, ETHICAL, AND LEGAL FOUNDATIONS OF EMS (6 Credits)

    This course explains various aspects of the government’s role in public safety as well as the American legal system, fire and emergency medical services (EMS) operations, employment and personnel issues, and emergency officials’ roles. The course also discusses legislative and political influence in fire and EMS.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 403: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course examines the knowledge and skills needed to become a responsible leader and manage a crew of firefighters. Topics include leadership and management, specifically managing budgets, personnel, and standard operating procedures. The course also analyzes challenges related to the creation of a team environment, situational leadership, and ethical decision making.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 414: PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FOR FIRE AND EMS (6 Credits)

    This course examines fundamental issues in personnel administration and human resource development in fire and EMS agencies. Students will explore concepts and responsibilities such as management, organizational development and training, employee recruitment, selection, and productivity, as well as performance management and labor relations.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 420: MITIGATION AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course describes the methods and techniques used to lessen the potential impact of disasters and improve readiness to respond. Included are the principles related to mitigation as they pertain to sustainability and building resilient communities. Students will design a risk assessment plan. 

    Prerequisites Required: FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 425: DISASTER POLICY IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course focuses on the administrative roles of local, state, and federal governments in times of disaster and the importance of intergovernmental relations. The policymaking process and the historical evolution of disaster policy are reviewed.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    FS 498: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN FIRE SCIENCE (6 Credits)

    This course is designed as the culminating experience of the bachelor’s degree programs in fire science. This course consists of a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the fire science curricula. The assignments are designed to test application and critical thinking skills as students work through fact-based scenarios and analyze issues affecting contemporary practice.

    Prerequisites Required: Last term or permission from the Dean

    Total Major Credits: 100
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Electives

    OPEN ELECTIVES (47 Credits)

    Total Electives Credits: 47
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Prior Degree

    Comparable Associate’s or Bachelor’s Degree (90 Credits)

    Total Prior Degree Credits: 90
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Comparability is determined by a course-by-course examination of the prior associate's or bachelor's degree against the core requirements of a Kaplan University associate’s degree.

    Prerequisites

    FS 105: FIRE PREVENTION PRACTICES (5 Credits)

    This course examines fire avoidance measures, including fire prevention education, fire safety inspection, fire code enforcement, and fire investigation. Students will gain an overview of the procedures and principles of inspections commonly conducted for control of structures, occupancy, or combined purposes.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 120: INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course covers the four phases of emergency management: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Topics include organizing for emergency management, coordinating for community resources, and the roles of government agencies at all levels. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of comprehensive and integrated emergency management.

    Prerequisites Required:

    CM 107

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 220: PREPAREDNESS AND PLANNING FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    This course analyzes the rationale for and methods related to all-hazards emergency preparedness and planning. Topics include preparedness strategies, planning concepts and processes, public awareness programs, and training and exercise programs.

    Prerequisites Required:

    FS 120

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Bachelor's Core

    CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM (5 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students
    a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their effect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE (5 Credits)

    Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

     

     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Bachelor's Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Major

    CJ 307: CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN TERRORIST ATTACKS AND DISASTERS (6 Credits)

    This course will cover the methodology and rationale behind the unified response to a terrorist, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), or disaster incident within the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS). Students will explore the management and incident command response to terrorist, WMD, or disaster events, including elements of logistics, budgeting, prioritization, staffing, and support. Students will examine these methodologies from the perspective of crisis management and consequence management.

    Prerequisites Required: CJ 101

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 304: COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION FOR FIRE AND EMS (6 Credits)

    This course analyzes theories for understanding ethical, social, organizational, political, and legal aspects of community risk reduction for fire and EMS agencies. Students will learn to utilize common methods for developing effective and comprehensive community risk-reduction plans.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 320: RECOVERY PRACTICES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course describes how people, groups, organizations, communities, and governments manage disasters in the immediate aftermath and recover from their effects, including social, physical, business, and infrastructure problems as well as intra- and interorganizational planning. 

    Prerequisites Required: FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 401: FIRE PREVENTION ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course explores the modern management and planning techniques that are utilized to organize a fire department. Students will examine fire department organization and management through community risk reduction, codes and standards, inspections, plan review, incident investigation, fire prevention research, and the relationship of master planning to fire prevention.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 402: POLITICAL, ETHICAL, AND LEGAL FOUNDATIONS OF EMS (6 Credits)

    This course explains various aspects of the government’s role in public safety as well as the American legal system, fire and emergency medical services (EMS) operations, employment and personnel issues, and emergency officials’ roles. The course also discusses legislative and political influence in fire and EMS.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 403: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course examines the knowledge and skills needed to become a responsible leader and manage a crew of firefighters. Topics include leadership and management, specifically managing budgets, personnel, and standard operating procedures. The course also analyzes challenges related to the creation of a team environment, situational leadership, and ethical decision making.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 414: PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FOR FIRE AND EMS (6 Credits)

    This course examines fundamental issues in personnel administration and human resource development in fire and EMS agencies. Students will explore concepts and responsibilities such as management, organizational development and training, employee recruitment, selection, and productivity, as well as performance management and labor relations.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 100 or FS 120 for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Management 

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 420: MITIGATION AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course describes the methods and techniques used to lessen the potential impact of disasters and improve readiness to respond. Included are the principles related to mitigation as they pertain to sustainability and building resilient communities. Students will design a risk assessment plan. 

    Prerequisites Required: FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 425: DISASTER POLICY IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course focuses on the administrative roles of local, state, and federal governments in times of disaster and the importance of intergovernmental relations. The policymaking process and the historical evolution of disaster policy are reviewed.

    Prerequisites Required: FS 120

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    FS 498: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN FIRE SCIENCE (6 Credits)

    This course is designed as the culminating experience of the bachelor’s degree programs in fire science. This course consists of a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the fire science curricula. The assignments are designed to test application and critical thinking skills as students work through fact-based scenarios and analyze issues affecting contemporary practice.

    Prerequisites Required: Last term or permission from the Dean

    Total Major Credits: 60
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Electives

    OPEN ELECTIVES (12 Credits)

    Total Electives Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Tuition & Fees: Standard Track

    The 25% tuition reduction applies only to international students living outside of the United States. This discount does not apply to military students. Please check with your advisor to see if you are eligible. 

    The 25% tuition reduction applies only to international students living outside of the United States. This discount does not apply to military students. Please check with your advisor to see if you are eligible. 

    Standard Track Online &
    Learning Center
    Campus
    Cost Per Credit
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    Tuition and Fees

    Some programs have additional associated fees that are not included in the price of tuition. Click here or check with an Admissions Advisor for more information. 

    Learn More about Kaplan University Tuition and Fees  

    Notice to Learning Center Students

    Kaplan University Learning Center students will only complete a portion of this program on site. You will need to complete at least 50% of the program requirements online, or through transfer credit awarded via prior learning assessment. If you have any questions about these requirements, please speak with an admissions advisor.

    Scholarships and Grants

    Learn more about grants and Kaplan University Scholarships and that may help reduce the cost of your education.

    Kaplan University tuition reductions (including active-duty, spouse, and veterans military tuition rates; scholarships; grants; vouchers; and alumni and alliance reductions) cannot be combined. 

    Tuition Rates for Military Students and Spouses

    Kaplan University has significantly reduced many of our tuition rates and fees for active-duty servicemembers, their spouses, and veterans. Click here for more information.
     

  • Some states have additional curricular requirements. Check the University Catalog or speak with an Admissions Advisor.

  • * Kaplan University cannot guarantee employment or career advancement.

    Associate’s and bachelor’s degrees and credits considered to be remedial, occupational, or specialized may not be accepted for transfer. Average completion time based on a full-time schedule. Programs will take longer for part-time students to complete. Refer to the University Catalog for our Transfer of Credit policy.

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