K
  • This program is offered online.
  • Certain courses offered by Kaplan University are available to nondegree-seeking participants. Upon successful completion of a course, the participant may transfer the credits earned toward a degree at Kaplan University if the course is part of the Kaplan University degree program.

    Students who successfully complete all of the requisite courses associated with a certificate program may petition for academic graduation from the applicable certificate program. Students must meet all additional admissions and academic graduation requirements detailed in the admissions and degree-seeking academic graduation criteria of those certificate programs. Participants are under no obligation to enroll at Kaplan University upon completion. 

  • Curriculum: Undergraduate Single Courses

    Social and Behavioral Sciences - Undergraduate Courses

    CM 313: TOOLS FOR THE DIGITAL AGE (6 Credits)

    This course introduces students to the concepts necessary for effectively using new technologies and digital tools. By applying these concepts to the communication context (purpose and audience), students will be able to decide what tools are most appropriate. Students will also practice using a variety of digital tools and new technologies and reflect on how they affect communication.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Social and Behavioral Sciences - Undergraduate Courses Credits: 11
    Total Program Credits: 0

    PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology, one of the social sciences. Students will be introduced to a range of topics that offer insight into human thought and actions including what motivates us to study human behavior, ethical decisions, problem solving, and theories on memory, learning, intelligence, and personality. This course will highlight the use of critical thinking and the application of the concepts. In addition, it will draw on practical psychological concepts related to students’ personal and professional relationships. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Social and Behavioral Sciences - Undergraduate Courses Credits: 11
    Total Program Credits: 0

    General Education

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Building on your existing writing strengths will help develop a foundation for a successful education and career. You will learn strategies to express yourself with confidence and communicate your ideas effectively in personal, academic, and professional situations.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total General Education Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total General Education Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Health Sciences - Undergraduate

    EF 310: CURRENT TRENDS IN EXERCISE AND FITNESS—AGING WELL ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN (6 Credits)

    This course focuses on the issues in exercise and fitness that each major age group encounters in society today. Students learn the unique challenges that senior adults, middle-aged and younger adults, and children and adolescents are confronted with, as well as the sociological, psychological, and economic factors that can impact favorable outcomes. Motivational strategies, techniques, and plans for designing age-appropriate exercise and fitness programs will be discussed and practiced, and current research in models of exercise and fitness programs in community- and corporate-based settings will be studied and evaluated for effectiveness.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Undergraduate Credits: 29
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HS 420: ADVANCED HEALTH INFORMATICS (6 Credits)

    The health information field is strongly influenced by data and data standards. This course focuses on the structure and use of health information, storage methods, data sets, and e-health delivery. In addition, the development of clinical, financial, and decision support systems are addressed.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Undergraduate Credits: 29
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HW 205: VITAMINS, HERBS, AND NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS (5 Credits)

    This course introduces the most commonly used vitamins, herbs, and nutritional supplements. Single vitamins—their benefits, dosage, precautions, and contraindications—will be reviewed as well as vitamin formulas routinely recommended. Nutritional supplements will be introduced and their categories, benefits, and safety issues will be explored and discussed. The principal systems of herbal medicine found worldwide will be illustrated along with their individual characteristics and common usage. This course also examines the growing popularity of herbal medicines from a sociological and ecological standpoint.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Undergraduate Credits: 29
    Total Program Credits: 0

    HW 410: STRESS—CRITICAL ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT AND PREVENTION (6 Credits)

    This in-depth course offers students a detailed look at the extensive research and practical approaches for identification, management, and prevention of stress. The health consequences of stress—physiological and psychological—will be discussed as well as the sociological and economic effects of untreated stress on society as a whole. Current approaches to stress reduction and prevention will be illustrated including mind/body therapies that have shown remarkable rates of success. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Undergraduate Credits: 29
    Total Program Credits: 0

    NS 435: ECOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVES ON FOOD (6 Credits)

    This course presents ecological and environmental impacts on food choices and food production. Studies include the changes in food quality due to air, water, and ground pollution. Students learn the current trends in methods to prevent and manage the ecological and environmental pollution as it relates to food.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Undergraduate Credits: 29
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education

    ED 502: TRANSFORMING TEACHING PRACTICE (4 Credits)

    This course explores the knowledge, skills, and dispositions associated with the highest standards of teaching practice and guides students in the transformation of their classroom performance through research and reflection on best practices, assessment strategies, and teacher skills that lead to improved student achievement. 

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 506: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course introduces students to prominent research-based theories of learning and examines the impact of these theories on students, learning and motivation, teaching, and assessment. Students critically evaluate opposing sides of current issues in educational psychology and articulate and defend personal positions on these issues.

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 511: TEACHING METHODS THROUGH DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION (4 Credits)

    This course explores major middle and secondary school issues, providing prospective teachers with the opportunity to reflect upon and develop their own practical vision of building a classroom environment that effectively promotes student learning. Focus is placed on a variety of instructional strategies, principles, and best practices for helping students learn in secondary school settings.

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 512: ACTION RESEARCH I (5 Credits)

    In this course, degree candidates will critically analyze readings and examples of action research, apply ideas from the action research paradigm to their own teaching and learning, and gain insight into methods of conducting action research. Candidates will also identify an educational issue and find, review, analyze, and synthesize prior research on an approved topic that pertains to that issue. Candidates will construct a literature review and draft methods sections of the culminating action research project. This course will conclude with an examination of various data analysis techniques and the preparation of an action research plan, which candidates will use as a guide to conduct teacher inquiry in their classrooms or other settings.
     

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 513: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (4 Credits)

    This course examines the course of normal child and adolescent development. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying development theory to classroom management and educational practice, and understanding how development influences academic achievement. Students will learn how to apply knowledge of child and adolescent development to their teaching practice as a way to identify various student behaviors and create classroom management strategies that address those behaviors.

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 521: READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS (4 Credits)

    This course, grounded in the theoretical bases of balanced literacy and constructivist learning, focuses on building prospective teachers’ competence in the processes of planning, implementing, and evaluating content-area literacy learning for secondary students. Students will use a standards-based approach in crafting strategies to increase reading comprehension in different content areas. Topics covered include using writing to improve reading, teaching diverse students, and using technology in reading instruction.

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 522: CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT (5 Credits)

    Educators will examine several classroom management theorists in order to provide a comprehensive overview of models and ideas on which to base their own philosophy and practice. Through a case-based approach, students will gain a clear understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of classroom management and its effect on student behavior and achievement. Students will examine classroom management and discipline in contemporary schools, the effects of classroom management problems, and the need to consider student diversity. 

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 523: RESEARCH ON EFFECTIVE TEACHING (4 Credits)

    This course acquaints students with the broad body of research on effective teaching, with an emphasis on applying research findings to students’ own classroom instruction. Students will review and synthesize the theoretical and methodological contributions of current research on a selected topic related to K–12 teaching practice.

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 531: SECONDARY STUDENT ASSESSMENT (4 Credits)

    This course examines best practices of assessing secondary student learning, with particular emphasis on the relationship between assessment procedures, instruction, and student achievement. Topics include the use of both formal and informal assessments, norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessments, formative and summative assessments, and methods of using assessment data to improve instruction and student achievement.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 541: METHODS OF TEACHING SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (4 Credits)

    This course focuses on methods of teaching the English language arts (ELA) including oral language, writing, reading, and literature. Students will learn about national and state content standards, effective instructional practices, the role technology plays in ELA instruction, and research-based assessment strategies in the field. Students will apply what they learn to create lesson plans and document how they will assess students’ growth in literacy.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 543: EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (4 Credits)

    This course focuses on preparing prospective teachers to plan and deliver appropriate instruction for all students in diverse and inclusive classroom settings, including students with disabilities, gifted/talented students, and students with limited English proficiency. The course examines a range of learning, emotional, and physiological disabilities, the history of attitudes towards those disabilities, and the federal mandates governing them. Social issues related to students with special needs will also be explored. Additionally, the course addresses individualized education programs and the role of the teacher in implementing them.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 551: METHODS OF TEACHING SECONDARY MATHEMATICS (4 Credits)

    This course examines current research-based practices on effective math teaching and learning that are aligned to national and state standards. Students will gain experience in lesson planning and will learn about assessment techniques and teaching styles to accommodate students with different learning styles. The course presents information on technology resources for teaching mathematics. Finally, students will discuss the process of becoming an effective mathematics educator.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 552: EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (5 Credits)

    In this course, students are introduced to the concept of instructional leaders and explore strategies for managing change in educational settings, including best practices for collaborative decision-making in schools. Students critically examine their current knowledge base, skill sets, and leadership abilities with the goal of improvement and increased self-awareness and reflection. Students explore the importance of the instructional leader in school cultures, the instructional leader’s impact on student learning, and how they can help facilitate effective change in school culture and student achievement.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 553: HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (4 Credits)

    This course introduces philosophical viewpoints that can affect new teachers' priorities and strategy choices in their practice. This course will also provide a historical perspective of how public education has become a democratic right in the United States. Candidates will compare and contrast philosophical theories that have driven pedagogy over the past two centuries. Candidates will also evaluate current research in their quest to develop as reflective and creative practitioners in the twenty-first century classroom.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 555: LEARNING THEORIES (5 Credits)

    This course is an in-depth review of theoretical principles, concepts, and research findings on learning and education, with an emphasis on application to educational practices. Learning strategies for child, adolescent, and adult learners are reviewed. Students will explore additional concepts of learning including motivation and intelligence theories, learning styles, and technology-mediated learning. Case studies, problem-solving strategies, collaborative learning, emergent technologies, and distance-learning techniques are discussed and modeled throughout the course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None  

     

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 561: METHODS OF TEACHING SECONDARY SCIENCE (4 Credits)

    This course surveys a broad range of concepts related to teaching various scientific disciplines (e.g., biology, chemistry, and physics) to diverse learners. The course emphasizes a standards-based approach that highlights connections among current research in natural science, real-world phenomena, and classroom instruction. Students will gain experience in lesson planning and will learn about assessment techniques and teaching styles to accommodate students with different learning styles. Students will also explore what it means to become an effective science educator. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 571: METHODS OF TEACHING SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES (4 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore and develop effective strategies for teaching the core disciplines of social studies (e.g., anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology) at the secondary level. Students will incorporate best practices based on educational research, with an emphasis on helping students develop twenty-first century skills related to the core disciplines of social studies. Special attention will be given to national and state standards, state initiatives, assessment, and the use of appropriate resources, including technology, for effective social studies instruction.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 581: SECONDARY CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT (4 Credits)

    This course focuses on training teachers to organize their classroom to maximize the amount of time students are actively engaged in learning. The foundation of the course uses classroom-management strategies developed by leading educators, including Harry K. and Rosemary Wong. Students will go through online instruction and in-depth reflection, and will demonstrate mastery of course material by designing a personal classroom management action plan that will be easily implemented in their classroom.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 586: METHODS OF TEACHING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE (4 Credits)

    This course focuses on principles, strategies, national and state standards, lesson planning, and assessment in foreign language instruction. The course will guide students through the theoretical and research-based foundations of language acquisition. Students will get the opportunity to translate some of these theoretical principles into classroom practice. The course will highlight the teacher’s role as facilitator and enable teachers to harness technology so that language instruction can be presented as authentic, functional communication that fully engages students.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    ED 591: METHODS OF TEACHING VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (4 Credits)

    This course will focus on theories, methods, and practices in visual and performing arts education. Students will gain experience in creating lessons that meet national and state standards, evaluating and choosing authentic assessment strategies, and learning how to reach diverse learners in their specialty areas. Students will incorporate best practices based on educational research and learn about the role technology can play in instruction. Students will learn about differentiating instruction, cooperative learning, collaborating with peers, and authentic activities. A chance to consider a reflective teaching practice will be provided.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education Credits: 85
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Please note: All graduate education courses are subject to minimum enrollments.

    Graduate Education - Educational Leadership

    ER 502: THE PRINCIPALSHIP (5 Credits)

    This course examines school culture, standards, community building, and leadership in the context of issues and constraints that principals routinely face. The content of the course will inform decision making that influences practice and the effects on students and teachers. Students will review research on leading change in schools, training for tomorrow's principalship, budgeting issues, discipline, students with exceptionalities and who are from diverse backgrounds, technol­ogy, professional conduct, teacher evaluation, and establishment of effective professional learning communities. Students will review case studies about schools that made significant improvements under effective leadership.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Leadership Credits: 17
    Total Program Credits: 0

    ER 504: MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES (4 Credits)

    This course will examine the economics of educa­tion, funding sources, and regulations regarding the use of such funds. Students will determine major budget pressures facing schools and identify ways they are meeting daily demands to provide quality education. The role of federal and state lawmakers in funding decisions will be explored. Students will consider the implications of poorly funded education and the impact on society. They will also address administering school resources including funding.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Leadership Credits: 17
    Total Program Credits: 0

    ER 506: LEGAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION (4 Credits)

    Students will examine the interrelationship of law and education policy, court rulings on school governance, and the federal government’s funding of education. Topics include constitutional rights, such as Title VII, the First Amendment, and the
    Fourteenth Amendment, and current events regarding the law and education. Students will analyze resources designed to help educators navigate legal issues.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Leadership Credits: 17
    Total Program Credits: 0

    ER 508: SUPERVISION AND INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP (4 Credits)

    The course addresses major factors that affect school leadership and how leadership can influence teacher effectiveness. Students will examine the role of leadership in building and sustaining a school vision, creating effective teacher teams, sharing leadership, leading learning communities, making data-driven decisions, and monitoring curriculum and instruction. Students will explore models of effective leadership based on best practices. In addition, students will analyze the research on instructional leadership and the methods principals use to exhibit and harness leadership that enable schools to meet their goals.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Leadership Credits: 17
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education - Educational Technology

    ET 501: USING TECHNOLOGY—FUNDAMENTALS OF INTEGRATION (4 Credits)

    Degree candidates are introduced to effective strategies for integrating technology into classroom instruction. Candidates use learning theory and best practices to evaluate sample lesson plans and also to develop activities that integrate educational technology. Specific emphasis is given to aligning activities with relevant national standards.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Technology Credits: 13
    Total Program Credits: 0

    ET 502: USING TECHNOLOGY—PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS (4 Credits)

    This course provides students with opportunities to explore a variety of web-based tools and basic computer software applications, and evaluate their applicability in the K–12 classroom. Students will gain technology skills and explore ways to integrate these tools into teaching and learning. Students will develop learning strategies that align with professional standards.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Technology Credits: 13
    Total Program Credits: 0

    ET 513: USING TECHNOLOGY—APPLICATIONS IN THE CONTENT AREAS (5 Credits)

    This course provides students with opportunities to explore a variety of instructional technologies including: web-based tools, software, games, simulations, tutorials, and nonprojected visuals. Through readings, class discussions, and hands-on experiences using technologies, students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to integrate technology in lesson planning that meets the needs of diverse learners.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Educational Technology Credits: 13
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education - Higher Education

    HE 559: QUANTITATIVE METHODS AND INSTRUMENTS FOR ASSESSMENT (5 Credits)

    This course presents an in-depth overview of typical quantitative research designs, methods, data collection tools, and data analysis and reporting used in assessment and evaluation. It focuses on the research process related to assessment and evaluation and the basic skills required to plan, conduct, analyze, report, and evaluate research with a quantitative design. Detailed procedures associated with quantitative research, including experimental, quasi-experimental, survey, and correlational designs, are examined. Practical limitations of quantitative designs in assessment and evaluation and the role of quantitative research in mixed-method approaches are considered.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Graduate Education - Higher Education Credits: 5
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education - Instructional Technology

    IX 510: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN (5 Credits)

    This course presents the philosophical and theoretical foundation of instructional design. Students explore instructional design process models com­monly used by practitioners. They will apply the stages of a process model to create design documents in the education and training contexts. The model will address instructional analysis, assessing learning from instruction, media characteristics and selection, managing instruction, formative and summative evaluation, and the motivational design of instruction.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IX 520: NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING (5 Credits)

    This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to identify training and/or instructional problems and potential solutions. Students explore the advantages and disadvantages of multiple techniques for performing a needs assessment. Students develop skills and collect resources related to the selection and use of analysis methods. They will conduct a needs analysis and submit a report in an education or training context. Students also consider evaluation taxonomies and models, tools and techniques, and develop an evaluation strategy for an instructional program.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IX 540: RESEARCH METHODS FOR EDUCATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This practitioner-oriented course is designed to allow students to explore methodologies, designs, and tools used for research in higher education, K-12, military, corporate, and nonprofit organizations. Students will critically analyze readings and examples of research, and plan an applied research proposal on an approved topic in the field of education or instructional design and technology. Other learning activities include reviewing data analysis techniques and examining ethical standards for conducting research.

    Prerequisites Required:

     None  

     

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IX 550: PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING (5 Credits)

    This course presents approaches to project management for education and training projects. Students explore concepts of project management and leadership, tools, procedures, and methodologies. They focus on creating, monitoring, and reporting project plans from the proposal to the implementation stages. They consider project constraints including time, cost, resource allocation, and scope. Concepts of change management are also explored and applied to implementation strategies used in education and training environ­ments.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IX 560: INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES INFRASTRUCTURE (6 Credits)

    This course provides an introduction to computer networking and establishes a basic understanding of the infrastructure required to incorporate technology into the K–12 environment. Students will learn the basics of computer networks and technology infrastructure. They will also learn how infrastructure supports classroom design for learning with technology tools. Students will identify the skills necessary to design, install, maintain, and troubleshoot the technology and analyze the roles necessary to maintain effective infrastructure. In addition, students will learn how to assess institutional technology needs and plan for future growth.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IX 562: TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS-K-12 (6 Credits)

    In this practitioner-oriented course, students will explore existing and emerging multimedia technologies used in K–12 classrooms through peer and individual assignments. They will evaluate existing instructional resources available with classroom textbooks in open source content and learning object repositories. They will design and create an instructional lesson appropriate for the K–12 setting while adhering to federal, state, and local mandates regarding media development.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    IX 570: DESIGN OF ONLINE INSTRUCTION IN K-12 ENVIRONMENTS (5 Credits)

    In this application-based course, students will explore similarities and differences between Web-based learning and on-ground learning in K-12 classrooms. They will learn how to repurpose existing material and chunk content into online modules while organizing and managing reusable learning objects. They will design assessment items suitable for the online environment and learn about issues related to assessing students from a distance. They will create design docu­ments and content for an online course. Students will participate in peer-review evaluations and provide constructive feedback based on principles of online instructional design.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Instructional Technology Credits: 37
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education - Teaching Literacy

    LT 504: READING DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION (4 Credits)

    This course will focus on the development and use of diagnostic instruments and practices that help teachers discern the nature of individual differences in literacy abilities, especially among readers and writers with special learning challenges. Methods of constructing individualized, corrective treatment plans and procedures for K-12 and adult learners will be discussed.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Literacy Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 0

    LT 516: READING AND WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM (4 Credits)

    This course covers methods of teaching reading and writing across the K-12 curriculum. The focus is project-based teaching that incorporates strategies for prewriting; developing writing skills; developing writing skills, which include analysis, problem solving, and critical thinking; and integrating technology into instruction. Students will align lessons with National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and state standards. Teachers will learn the process of designing and implementing instruction that develops their students' growth in functional and digital literacy.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Literacy Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 0

    LT 520: APPROACHES TO LITERACY (4  Credits)

    This course provides an overview of literacy instruction for the English/language arts classroom. The course covers historical trends and theoretical models for literacy instruction; the alignment of instruction with state and national standards and assessment; new digital literacies and the use of technology; and best practices in comprehensive literacy instruction. The course culminates in a comprehensive final research project that investigates an aspect of literacy instruction.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Literacy Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education - Teaching Mathematics

    MH 521: PRINCIPLES, PEDAGOGY, AND STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS (4 Credits)

    This course focuses on the development of teachers prepared to offer mathematics instruction for high school students. The focus is on instructional strategies that help students gain the mathematics skills they will need for personal, academic, and professional life. The course gives teachers the opportunity to explore emerging knowledge and tools and new ways for communicating and teaching mathematics. Teachers will study foundational principles for school mathematics: equity, curriculum, teaching, learning, assessment, and technology. The course emphasizes congruence with national and state standards for mathematics teaching and student achievement.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Mathematics Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MH 530: NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS (4 Credits)

    This course is a study and application of strategies, techniques, materials, technology, and current research used in the teaching of mathematics at the middle school and high school levels. Learners will review and apply the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards and principles involved in teaching mathematics at the middle school and high school levels. Learners will develop an awareness of the constructivist theory, professional resources, materials, technology, and information available for educators, and prepare unit and lesson plans with related assessment procedures on a mathematical topic.

     

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Mathematics Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MH 531: DEVELOPING MATHEMATICAL PROFICIENCY—ALGEBRA (4 Credits)

    This course provides an in-depth examination of the content and instructional strategies that help middle school and high school students develop mathematical proficiency and an understanding of algebraic concepts and functions. The course examines best practices for helping students explore and represent problem situations using tables, equations, graphs, and technology. Course topics provide a sequential understanding of algebraic understanding and student achievement from middle school through high school as aligned with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Mathematics Credits: 12
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Graduate Education - Teaching Science

    SE 521: PLANNING AND TEACHING AN INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE CLASS (GRADES 6–12) (4 Credits)

    This course will provide an active instructional environment that fosters the development of teachers effectively prepared to offer inquiry-based science instruction for middle and high school students. The course focuses on instructional strategies that help students gain an understanding of the perspectives and practices scientists use when they approach the natural world through scientific inquiry. The course addresses practices for planning, facilitating, and assessing learning activities that encourage students to actively engage in their own scientific inquiries. The course emphasizes congruence with national and state standards for science teaching, scientific literacy, and student achievement.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Graduate Education - Teaching Science Credits: 4
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Health Sciences - Graduate Public Health

    PU 615: GRANT AND CONTRACT WRITING (4 Credits)

    This course provides a general overview of the grant-seeking process. Students study types of projects that generally receive funding, sources that can be used to identify prospective funders, and the essential components of a well-written grant. Students design a grant application using a real-life scenario needs statement, develop a proj­ect that will address that need, write clear goals and objectives for that project, develop a budget, and identify an evaluation tool that could be used to measure outcomes for the project. All phases of the contract formulation process are addressed, and students learn how to write a statement of work document for commonly used contracts in public health administration.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Graduate Public Health Credits: 4
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Arts and Sciences - Graduate Psychology Courses

    PS 512: RESEARCH DESIGN IN APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (5 Credits)

    This course will introduce students to the different mixed-method approaches to research used within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. Students will learn how to use this knowledge to select an appropriate research method when given a real-world situation. Students will also be introduced to the practical, legal, ethical, and sociocultural issues that are unique to research design within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Arts and Sciences - Graduate Psychology Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    PS 517: ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (5 Credits)

    This course covers advanced principles, theo­ries, and concepts of Applied Behavior Analysis. The assessment and development of behavioral interventions are covered, along with real-life examples, case studies, and current research in this area of psychology.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Arts and Sciences - Graduate Psychology Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    PS 522: BEHAVIORAL MEASURES AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA (5 Credits)

    This course will provide students with a founda­tional knowledge of measurement and analysis in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). Students will learn how to identify and measure target behaviors, as well as evaluate the accuracy of the data presented within current research studies and real-life examples. Finally, students will learn how to communicate the results of a research study in a clear, efficient, and parsimonious manner.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Arts and Sciences - Graduate Psychology Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    PS 527: IMPLEMENTING BEHAVIORAL CHANGE (5 Credits)

    This course covers the fundamentals of implementing a behavior change program in Applied Behavioral Analysis. Students will gain skill and practice in how to design an effective behavior change program through the use of real-life case study examples. The different factors involved in maintaining and promoting the generalization of behavioral change in real-world settings will be explored.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Arts and Sciences - Graduate Psychology Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    PS 532: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (5 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the various theoretical models of behavior change, along with more current research on evidence-based best practices in Applied Behavior Analysis. Students will incorporate the practical, ethical, legal, socio­emotional, and cultural needs of a client into an effective behavior change plan.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Arts and Sciences - Graduate Psychology Courses Credits: 25
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Nursing - Advanced Practice Nursing Core Essentials

    MN 551: ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN (5 Credits)

    This course integrates knowledge of advanced physiology and pathophysiology across the life span and the clinical implications for the advanced practice nurse. Function and dysfunction of organ systems are analyzed from the cellular level through the integrated organ level. Students will examine the pathophysiological factors that influence the incidence and manifestations of acute, episodic, and chronic diseases in populations across the life span. Disease processes and symptom management approaches are investigated utilizing an evidence-based approach.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Nursing - Advanced Practice Nursing Core Essentials Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MN 552: ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT (5 Credits)

    This course provides the student with the skills and knowledge to conduct a focused and comprehensive health history, and a functional, physical, and psychosocial assessment. Relationships between assessment findings and underlying physiology and pathophysiology to the healthy and unhealthy client are investigated. Clinical judgment and clinical reasoning skills are used in establishing differential diagnoses. Students will learn to address variables such as age, culture, ethnicity, and developmental stages into their differential diagnosis and evaluation and management plans.

    Prerequisites Required: MN 551 and MN 553

    Total Nursing - Advanced Practice Nursing Core Essentials Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    MN 553: ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN (5 Credits)

    This course integrates advanced knowledge of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and genomics across the life span and prepares the advanced practice nurse to prescribe pharmacotherapeutics safely and effectively. Students will apply client history and physical examination findings, together with laboratory and imaging studies, in the evidence-based selection of the correct prescriptive and nonprescriptive medications for therapy. Students will examine ethical, legal, regulatory, and cost-effective prescribing practices of the advanced practice nurse. Communication plans for the interdisciplinary team, clients, and/or families for both prescriptive and nonprescriptive drug therapies will be created.

    Prerequisites Required: MN 551

    Total Nursing - Advanced Practice Nursing Core Essentials Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 0

    Health Sciences - Graduate Health Care Administration

    HA 515: LEADERSHIP IN HEALTH CARE (4 Credits)

    This course explores organizational theory and behavior essential for successful leadership and management in the health care industry. Emphasis will be placed on communication techniques, self-analysis, and strategies for best practices in order to effectively implement key leadership and management concepts in dynamic health care environments. Key values that guide a leader's personal and professional behavior and influence overall effectiveness will be explored, as well as their impact on overall leadership styles.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Health Sciences - Graduate Health Care Administration Credits: 4
    Total Program Credits: 0

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