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  • Note: For certain locations, program enrollment is onsite with online instruction.

  • This program is offered online.
  • Kaplan University offers multiple start dates, giving you greater flexibility with your education, life, and work schedules.

    May 14

    Online Start Date
    May 14, 2014

    Jun 11

    Online and Campus Start Date
    Jun 11, 2014

    Jul 02

    Online Start Date
    Jul 02, 2014

    View the Academic Calendar
  • Curriculum: Standard Track

    Core

    CM 107: COLLEGE COMPOSITION I (5 Credits)

    Students will learn how to communicate effectively in their professional field using various writing styles. Students will also identify and further develop their own writing process. Grammar and mechanics will be reviewed, helping students focus on the areas that will improve their writing.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CM 220: COLLEGE COMPOSITION II (5 Credits)

    This course helps students apply research and critical thinking skills to develop effective arguments. Students will create professional writings, incorporating post-draft revision strategies and working constructively with colleagues.

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM (5 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students
    a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their affect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE (5 Credits)

    Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

     

     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    MM 212: COLLEGE ALGEBRA (5 Credits)

    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, and inequalities, systems of equations with two variables, polynomial functions, rational and radical equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, ratios, proportions, variation, and graphing.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    MM 150: SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS (5 Credits)

    Students will improve their background in mathematical concepts and skills utilizing real-world scenarios to solve math problems. Students will also enhance their own knowledge by demonstrating the ability to explain and interpret concepts, which is a valued skill in many fields. The topics may include sets, variables, measurement, and statistics.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 33
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Major

    CM 206: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS (5 Credits)

    This course introduces students to the principles of interpersonal communication and emphasizes how to be a more effective communicator in professional and personal situations. Emphasis is on interpersonal communication in varying contexts, focusing on professional communication as well as personal, social, and cultural dimensions. Topics include the communication process, the influence of perception on communication, verbal and nonverbal elements of interaction, listening, the communication of emotions, conflict management, and effective communication strategies.

    Prerequisites Required: Any College Composition I course

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    MM 207: STATISTICS (5 Credits)

    This course serves as an introduction to collecting, organizing and summarizing, and analyzing data using statistical software. Topics include basic terminology, measurement, sampling procedures, graphical and numerical descriptions of data, basic probability, and making inferences from a sample to the population. Statistical software is provided in the course and extensive use of that software is required. The course focuses on “thinking with” statistics rather than “computing” statistics. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 150 or higher

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 115: PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM AND PROFESSION (5 Credits)

    This course introduces students to the discipline of psychology and the Kaplan University Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree program. The field of study, skill sets, and contemporary issues related to various psychological fields will be discussed. Students will research the psychology degree and course offerings along with their professional and personal goals in order to map out their specific degree plan and career goals.   

    Prerequisites Required: None  

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 200: INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic principles and theories of cognition including such topics as memory formation, decision making, and problem solving in both children and adults. The theories will be explained using a combination of traditional cognitive and neuroscience principles. Students will learn how to apply these theories to typical situations faced by psychology professionals in a variety of settings.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124   

     

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 210: HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course explores the historical origins of psychological study and the influences that have shaped contemporary views of the field. Students will learn about the origins of the study of the mind, the social and cultural factors that shaped the scientific approach to psychology, and modern-day applications of psychology. Students will also be introduced to the major theories and theorists in this discipline.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course will explore the physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and personality development of human beings from conception through the end of adolescence. Students will develop an understanding of developmental theories and research methods used to investigate developmental change, the theoretical bases for our understanding of how human beings change, and the contextual and cultural factors that impact the growth and development of children.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I (6 Credits)

    This course provides learners with a basic understanding of the scientific method and how it applies to the field of psychology. It addresses the research methods used in psychology and the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It also teaches learners when it is appropriate to use one method over the other and how to evaluate the accuracy of the conclusions of a study. Finally, it addresses the ethical issues related to conducting research in psychology.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT (6 Credits)

    Personality is defined as a consistent pattern of thinking and behaving; it is the basis of "who we are." The theories regarding the development of personality are numerous, and each contributes to the understanding of the factors that define one's personality. This course examines the major psychological theories of personality and explores research dealing with the influence of genetic and environmental factors. Students will apply various theoretical models to real-world examples of normal and abnormal personality development.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 124

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 410: SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the strategies and tools that are used for the screening and assessment of various age groups. Topics include the history and purpose of assessment, ethical considerations, interviewing and observation techniques, understanding reports of intelligence, and achievement testing. Students will learn how to apply screening and assessment information to their work with children, adolescents, and adults.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 124 and PS 300

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology, one of the social sciences. Students will be introduced to a range of topics that offer insight into human thought and actions including what motivates us to study human behavior, ethical decisions, problem solving, and theories on memory, learning, intelligence, and personality. This course will highlight the use of critical thinking and the application of the concepts. In addition, it will draw on practical psychological concepts related to students’ personal and professional relationships. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    300/400 LEVEL: EMPHASIS AREA COURSES (24 Credits)

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    PS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Psychology. This course builds on the concepts of all the courses students have taken within the program of study. The capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their coursework in an original comprehensive project, and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program.

    Prerequisites Required: Last term

    Total Major Credits: 88
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Electives

    OPEN ELECTIVES* (59 Credits)

    Total Electives Credits: 59
    Total Program Credits: 180

    *Eligible students who choose to complete the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Psychology-to-Master of Science in Psychology option will take four graduate-level courses in addition to selected undergraduate electives.

    Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area

    PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN (6 Credits)

    This course examines the needs of exceptional children. The roles of teachers, parents, and other relevant "others" will be investigated in relationship to current practices, which include mainstreaming, inclusion, least-restrictive environment, and individual education programs.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 360: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS I (6 Credits)

    This course examines the behavior theory, principles, and procedures related to modifying existing behaviors and acquiring new behaviors. Students will begin to understand behavior modification techniques, such as reinforcement, punishment, extinction, discrimination training, generalization, shaping, classical conditioning, conditioned reinforcement, and schedules of reinforcement, by applying these behavior principles to real-world scenarios. Students will examine how behavior management can be used in various career fields.

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM  207

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 365: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS II (6 Credits)

    This course builds on Applied Behavior Analysis I to further examine the dynamics of behavior principles. In this course, students will explore advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) theories and apply them to case studies. Students will be able to explain how behavior-environment relationships play instrumental roles in behavior deficits or excesses. This course also will provide students with information on obtaining certification and licensing in the ABA field. Although certain programs at Kaplan University are designed to prepare students to take various certification or licensing exams, the University cannot guarantee the student will be eligible to sit for or pass those exams.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 360

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 430: PROGRAM DESIGN AND EVALUATION (6 Credits)

    This course focuses on the process for designing programs that meet the needs of multiple populations. It builds on fundamental concepts for designing individual behavior modification programs and research methods using the framework for social program planning and evaluation.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 300

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    Child Development Emphasis Area

    PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN (6 Credits)

    This course examines the needs of exceptional children. The roles of teachers, parents, and other relevant "others" will be investigated in relationship to current practices, which include mainstreaming, inclusion, least-restrictive environment, and individual education programs.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 345: LANGUAGE AND SPEECH DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS (6 Credits)

    This course examines the processes of language development in children, while integrating psychological theories and perspectives to explain this human phenomenon.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 350: WORKING WITH CHILDREN IN A DIVERSE WORLD (6 Credits)

    This course provides an analysis of the cultural factors that impact human development in childhood. Topics include development of cultural identity, the process of acculturation, and the impact of cultural background on social and educational experiences. Students will also explore strategies for working with diverse populations of children and techniques for creating an environment that is respectful and responsive to the needs of this population.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 420: SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS IN CHILDHOOD (6 Credits)

    Current issues in theory and research in developmental psychology will be examined specific to the importance of social relationships in childhood. Topics include emotional development and attachment, cognitive development and social understanding, the importance of peers, how the influence of the family changes as children mature, and the social landscape of adolescence.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area

    PS 390: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This course is an introduction to the field of industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology. Students will acquire foundational knowledge of I/O psychology and human behavior in the workplace by being introduced to the historical influences and current perspectives of the field. The course will provide both real-world and research-based applications to help students understand the potential of I/O psychology in society. Further, students will learn about the basics of personnel selection, training, morale, organization theory and development, consumer behavior, and industrial and labor relations.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 220

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    PS 391: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of leadership theories and approaches in the workplace. Students will learn how to critically think about the leadership process. Further, students will examine effective leadership competencies such as conflict management and resolution, communication, training, coaching, and leading groups and teams.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 390

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    PS 392: ATTITUDES AND MOTIVATION IN THE WORKPLACE (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the major theories and findings in research on motivation and attitudes. Students will explore individual differences, employee attitudes, and motivation. Additionally, students will be introduced to motivational strategies and models of performance in order to understand the effects on personal and professional behaviors and success in the workplace.
     

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    PS 451: SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS (6 Credits)

    This course will introduce students to employee selection, assessment, classification, and placement in organizations. The course explores the ethical, legal, and professional contexts, measurement of individual differences, performance appraisal and feedback, program design and evaluation, and human performance factors. Finally, students will cover ways psychology is applied in organizations to improve employee and team performance and quality of work life.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 300

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    Substance Abuse Emphasis Area

    PS 370: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    Students will explore various models and theories of health psychology, examine current research, understand the psychosocial factors involved in the onset and treatment of physical disease and illness, and study the impact of stress on mental and physical health. Students also will learn to develop and implement educational health psychology programming and to explain how health psychology principles will apply in therapy.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 124

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 375: SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT (6 Credits)

    This course examines the prevention, development, and treatment of substance use, abuse, and dependence among youth and adults. Topics include classification of illicit, prescription, and over-the-counter drugs, physiological and psychological effects of various drugs, the role of the brain in addiction, diagnostic criteria for alcohol and substance abuse and dependence, psychosocial factors involved in the development and maintenance of drug use and abuse, and models of education and treatment programs. Students will explore substance abuse among diverse populations.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This course explores the foundations of clinical psychology, including the history, practice, and application of psychology in clinical settings. Students will examine ethical and legal considerations in counseling, the roles and responsibilities of therapist and client, clinical skills, diversity issues, and professional development opportunities. Current topics related to clinical practice will also be covered.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 450: CASE MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of case management in clinical settings. Topics covered include: the roles and responsibilities of case managers and counselors, counseling skills, evaluation and assessment of client strengths and needs, treatment planning, administration of services, working within a treatment team, and discharge planning.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  410

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 180

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    Prior Degree

    Comparable Associate’s or Bachelor’s Degree (90 Credits)

    Total Prior Degree Credits: 90
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Comparability is determined by a course-by-course examination of the prior associate's or bachelor's degree against the core requirements of a Kaplan University associate’s degree.

    Prerequisites

    MM 207: STATISTICS (5 Credits)

    This course serves as an introduction to collecting, organizing and summarizing, and analyzing data using statistical software. Topics include basic terminology, measurement, sampling procedures, graphical and numerical descriptions of data, basic probability, and making inferences from a sample to the population. Statistical software is provided in the course and extensive use of that software is required. The course focuses on “thinking with” statistics rather than “computing” statistics. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM 150 or higher

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Advanced start students must satisfy the prerequisite requirements for MM 207: Statistics. Students who do not possess prior learning credit comparable to the required prerequisite courses will need to complete courses beyond the minimum degree requirements.

    PS 220: CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course will explore the physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and personality development of human beings from conception through the end of adolescence. Students will develop an understanding of developmental theories and research methods used to investigate developmental change, the theoretical bases for our understanding of how human beings change, and the contextual and cultural factors that impact the growth and development of children.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Advanced start students must satisfy the prerequisite requirements for MM 207: Statistics. Students who do not possess prior learning credit comparable to the required prerequisite courses will need to complete courses beyond the minimum degree requirements.

    PS 124: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (5 Credits)

    This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology, one of the social sciences. Students will be introduced to a range of topics that offer insight into human thought and actions including what motivates us to study human behavior, ethical decisions, problem solving, and theories on memory, learning, intelligence, and personality. This course will highlight the use of critical thinking and the application of the concepts. In addition, it will draw on practical psychological concepts related to students’ personal and professional relationships. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Prerequisites Credits: 15
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Advanced start students must satisfy the prerequisite requirements for MM 207: Statistics. Students who do not possess prior learning credit comparable to the required prerequisite courses will need to complete courses beyond the minimum degree requirements.

    Core

    CS 204: PROFESSIONAL PRESENCE (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to multidisciplinary techniques and concepts pertinent to lifelong career development and professionalism. Students explore career planning as a strategy and professionalism as a method in order to pursue employment interests and career goals. Concepts include various professional communication skills appropriate for the global workplace, interpersonal relationship management, professional behavior, financial decision making, marketability, and using proper technologies to manage professional identities. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    Total Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SS 236: PEOPLE, POWER, AND POLITICS—AN INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (5 Credits)

    The purpose of this introductory-level American government course is to provide students with crucial knowledge about how government works and about how they, as individual citizens, fit within that system. Focus is on the rights and obligations of citizens under the democratic political system established under the U.S. Constitution; the branches and levels of government; and the role of the media. This fundamental knowledge combined with critical thinking skills will be valuable personally and professionally.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 211: THE 1960S—RESHAPING THE AMERICAN DREAM (5 Credits)

    This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights, and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    SS 250: THE TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION—A SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC APPROACH (5 Credits)

    This is a social science survey course that will examine science and technology from a variety of social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, history, political science, anthropology, and economics. The use of science and technology has been a driving force behind all of human history, and even more so today. This course will take an interactive approach to study the relationship between humanity and technology throughout time and across the globe. 

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    Total Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    SC 200: DISCOVERING SCIENCE—CURRENT ISSUES IN A CHANGING WORLD (5 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the course will give students
    a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives. 

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 246: FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (5 Credits)

    Fundamentals of Microbiology will review basic microbial cell structure, function, and genetics. The role of microorganisms and their affect on humans and the environment will also be explained. Aspects of medical and public health will be emphasized, as will bacterial and viral diseases, parasites, immunology, and epidemiology. Course material and labs are directly relevant to studies in health sciences, biological sciences, nursing, and genetics. (Includes a 1 credit hour lab)

    Prerequisites Required: None

    SC 235: GENERAL BIOLOGY I—HUMAN PERSPECTIVES (5 Credits)

    In this introduction to biology, students will explore the living world of humans. The course emphasizes the processes of life from the molecular work of genes and proteins to human organ systems, all the way up to food webs and overpopulation. Practical applications of biology in everyday life are stressed throughout the course. No prior study of biology is required to enroll in this nonmajors course.

    Prerequisites Required:

    None

    SC 250: SCIENCE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE (5 Credits)

    Science for Everyday Life is designed to help students recognize the importance of science as it impacts their daily lives in so many different ways. In this course, students will explore different rooms within a typical home and discover what role science plays as they investigate areas such as their kitchen and bathroom, the garden, and even the impact science has on their families and pets. The knowledge gained in this course will help garner a new appreciation for the science applications already around us and how to interpret the strengths and weaknesses of information streaming in from various sources.

     

     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    HU 200: CRITICAL EVALUATION IN THE HUMANITIES (5 Credits)

    In this course, students will explore the impact of creative expression on cultures from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. By studying examples from the arts and humanities, students investigate how humans have the potential to shape history. Students develop skills to evaluate and analyze forms of creative expression, and discover how to apply these skills to their career goals, community, and daily experience.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 245: ETHICS (5 Credits)

    In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

    Prerequisites Required: Any college composition course

    HU 250: HUMANITIES AND CULTURE (5 Credits)

    This course is a survey of human social and cultural life through an introduction to humanist theories and historical subject matter. Beginning with village settlement and the rise of cities and ending with the development of modern nations, students study the expression of human ideas and traditions through material and nonmaterial culture. Through readings and discussions, students are introduced to humanist studies and learn to appreciate cultural continuity and change as defining characteristics of the human experience.
     

    Prerequisites Required: None

    Total Core Credits: 18
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Major

    PS 300: RESEARCH METHODS I (6 Credits)

    This course provides learners with a basic understanding of the scientific method and how it applies to the field of psychology. It addresses the research methods used in psychology and the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It also teaches learners when it is appropriate to use one method over the other and how to evaluate the accuracy of the conclusions of a study. Finally, it addresses the ethical issues related to conducting research in psychology.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    PS 330: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT (6 Credits)

    Personality is defined as a consistent pattern of thinking and behaving; it is the basis of "who we are." The theories regarding the development of personality are numerous, and each contributes to the understanding of the factors that define one's personality. This course examines the major psychological theories of personality and explores research dealing with the influence of genetic and environmental factors. Students will apply various theoretical models to real-world examples of normal and abnormal personality development.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 124

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    PS 410: SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the strategies and tools that are used for the screening and assessment of various age groups. Topics include the history and purpose of assessment, ethical considerations, interviewing and observation techniques, understanding reports of intelligence, and achievement testing. Students will learn how to apply screening and assessment information to their work with children, adolescents, and adults.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 124 and PS 300

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    300/400 LEVEL: EMPHASIS AREA COURSES (24 Credits)

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    PS 499: BACHELOR'S CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Psychology. This course builds on the concepts of all the courses students have taken within the program of study. The capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their coursework in an original comprehensive project, and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program.

    Prerequisites Required: Last term

    Total Major Credits: 48
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Electives

    OPEN ELECTIVES (24 Credits)

    Total Electives Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area

    PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN (6 Credits)

    This course examines the needs of exceptional children. The roles of teachers, parents, and other relevant "others" will be investigated in relationship to current practices, which include mainstreaming, inclusion, least-restrictive environment, and individual education programs.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 360: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS I (6 Credits)

    This course examines the behavior theory, principles, and procedures related to modifying existing behaviors and acquiring new behaviors. Students will begin to understand behavior modification techniques, such as reinforcement, punishment, extinction, discrimination training, generalization, shaping, classical conditioning, conditioned reinforcement, and schedules of reinforcement, by applying these behavior principles to real-world scenarios. Students will examine how behavior management can be used in various career fields.

    Prerequisites Required:

    MM  207

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 365: APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS II (6 Credits)

    This course builds on Applied Behavior Analysis I to further examine the dynamics of behavior principles. In this course, students will explore advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) theories and apply them to case studies. Students will be able to explain how behavior-environment relationships play instrumental roles in behavior deficits or excesses. This course also will provide students with information on obtaining certification and licensing in the ABA field. Although certain programs at Kaplan University are designed to prepare students to take various certification or licensing exams, the University cannot guarantee the student will be eligible to sit for or pass those exams.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 360

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 430: PROGRAM DESIGN AND EVALUATION (6 Credits)

    This course focuses on the process for designing programs that meet the needs of multiple populations. It builds on fundamental concepts for designing individual behavior modification programs and research methods using the framework for social program planning and evaluation.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 300

    Total Applied Behavioral Analysis Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    Child Development Emphasis Area

    PS 340: EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS CHILDREN (6 Credits)

    This course examines the needs of exceptional children. The roles of teachers, parents, and other relevant "others" will be investigated in relationship to current practices, which include mainstreaming, inclusion, least-restrictive environment, and individual education programs.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 345: LANGUAGE AND SPEECH DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS (6 Credits)

    This course examines the processes of language development in children, while integrating psychological theories and perspectives to explain this human phenomenon.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 350: WORKING WITH CHILDREN IN A DIVERSE WORLD (6 Credits)

    This course provides an analysis of the cultural factors that impact human development in childhood. Topics include development of cultural identity, the process of acculturation, and the impact of cultural background on social and educational experiences. Students will also explore strategies for working with diverse populations of children and techniques for creating an environment that is respectful and responsive to the needs of this population.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  220

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 420: SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS IN CHILDHOOD (6 Credits)

    Current issues in theory and research in developmental psychology will be examined specific to the importance of social relationships in childhood. Topics include emotional development and attachment, cognitive development and social understanding, the importance of peers, how the influence of the family changes as children mature, and the social landscape of adolescence.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Child Development Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area

    PS 390: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This course is an introduction to the field of industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology. Students will acquire foundational knowledge of I/O psychology and human behavior in the workplace by being introduced to the historical influences and current perspectives of the field. The course will provide both real-world and research-based applications to help students understand the potential of I/O psychology in society. Further, students will learn about the basics of personnel selection, training, morale, organization theory and development, consumer behavior, and industrial and labor relations.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 220

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    PS 391: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of leadership theories and approaches in the workplace. Students will learn how to critically think about the leadership process. Further, students will examine effective leadership competencies such as conflict management and resolution, communication, training, coaching, and leading groups and teams.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 390

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    PS 392: ATTITUDES AND MOTIVATION IN THE WORKPLACE (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of the major theories and findings in research on motivation and attitudes. Students will explore individual differences, employee attitudes, and motivation. Additionally, students will be introduced to motivational strategies and models of performance in order to understand the effects on personal and professional behaviors and success in the workplace.
     

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    PS 451: SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS (6 Credits)

    This course will introduce students to employee selection, assessment, classification, and placement in organizations. The course explores the ethical, legal, and professional contexts, measurement of individual differences, performance appraisal and feedback, program design and evaluation, and human performance factors. Finally, students will cover ways psychology is applied in organizations to improve employee and team performance and quality of work life.
     

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 300

    Total Industrial/Organizational Psychology Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan. Emphasis area is not available in Tennessee.

    Substance Abuse Emphasis Area

    PS 370: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    Students will explore various models and theories of health psychology, examine current research, understand the psychosocial factors involved in the onset and treatment of physical disease and illness, and study the impact of stress on mental and physical health. Students also will learn to develop and implement educational health psychology programming and to explain how health psychology principles will apply in therapy.

    Prerequisites Required: PS 124

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 375: SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT (6 Credits)

    This course examines the prevention, development, and treatment of substance use, abuse, and dependence among youth and adults. Topics include classification of illicit, prescription, and over-the-counter drugs, physiological and psychological effects of various drugs, the role of the brain in addiction, diagnostic criteria for alcohol and substance abuse and dependence, psychosocial factors involved in the development and maintenance of drug use and abuse, and models of education and treatment programs. Students will explore substance abuse among diverse populations.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 380: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (6 Credits)

    This course explores the foundations of clinical psychology, including the history, practice, and application of psychology in clinical settings. Students will examine ethical and legal considerations in counseling, the roles and responsibilities of therapist and client, clinical skills, diversity issues, and professional development opportunities. Current topics related to clinical practice will also be covered.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS 124

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    PS 450: CASE MANAGEMENT (6 Credits)

    This course provides an overview of case management in clinical settings. Topics covered include: the roles and responsibilities of case managers and counselors, counseling skills, evaluation and assessment of client strengths and needs, treatment planning, administration of services, working within a treatment team, and discharge planning.

    Prerequisites Required:

    PS  410

    Total Substance Abuse Emphasis Area Credits: 24
    Total Program Credits: 90

    Emphasis area courses are completed within the major requirements of the degree plan.

    Tuition & Fees: Standard Track

    The 25% tuition reduction applies only to international students living outside of the United States. This discount does not apply to military students. Please check with your advisor to see if you are eligible. 

    The 25% tuition reduction applies only to international students living outside of the United States. This discount does not apply to military students. Please check with your advisor to see if you are eligible. 

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    Notice to Learning Center Students

    Kaplan University Learning Center students will only complete a portion of this program on site. You will need to complete at least 50% of the program requirements online, or through transfer credit awarded via prior learning assessment. If you have any questions about these requirements, please speak with an admissions advisor.

    Scholarships and Grants

    Learn more about grants and Kaplan University Scholarships and that may help reduce the cost of your education.

    Kaplan University tuition reductions (including active-duty, spouse, and veterans military tuition rates; scholarships; grants; vouchers; and alumni and alliance reductions) cannot be combined. 

    Tuition Rates for Military Students and Spouses

    Kaplan University has significantly reduced many of our tuition rates and fees for active-duty servicemembers, their spouses, and veterans. Click here for more information.
     

  • See Also

  • Some states have additional curricular requirements. Check the University Catalog or speak with an Admissions Advisor.

  • * Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-2013 Edition, Psychologists,http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Life-Physical-and-Social-Science/Psychologists.htm (accessed April, 2012). National long-term projections may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions, and do not guarantee actual job growth.

    While many of Kaplan University's degree programs are designed to prepare graduates to pursue continued bachelor-, graduate- or doctorate-level education, the University cannot guarantee that students will be granted admission to any programs. 

    Kaplan University cannot guarantee employment or career advancement. The professional practice of psychology is regulated by each state, and the degree requirements in this Bachelor of Science in Psychology program do not guarantee or prepare graduates for state licensure.

    § The BACB preapproves university training as meeting its eligibility requirements; it does not accredit university programs. 

    # Although certain programs at Kaplan University are designed to prepare students to take various certification or licensing exams, the University cannot guarantee the student will pass those exams. In some cases, field experience, additional coursework, and/or background checks may be necessary to take or to successfully pass the exams.

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